MARYSVILLE GLOBE
The Official Newspaper for
Marysville WA

October 1905




Volume XIV Number 38 - Friday, 6 October 1905
Official Paper of Marysville

HEADLINES

Additional Locals
Advertised Letters
Condensed County News
Council Will Reconsider
Crop Report
Good Templars Organize
State News in Brief
Women's Club Notes

EXTRACTED EVENTS

Type Names
Event
accident Thompson, P. Social and Personal Items - P. Thompson trimmed the tips of three fingers on his right hand at knot sawing last Tuesday. The cut is not serious.
accident, railroad Dellawig, Mrs. cow Stimson's Crossing - Mrs. Dellawig's cow was killed by the Great Northern passenger train Tuesday evening.
crime horses Social and Personal Items - A man who is reported to have stolen some horses near Mt. Vernon went through here about 3 o'clock Tuesday and left one animal all logged out.
crime jewelry Social and Personal Items - Three jewelry peddlers were arrested last Monday as being suspicious characters, but were released the following morning and given ten minutes to get out of town.
disease Turner, Elon Social and Personal Items - Elon Turner the young son of A. S. Turner was taken to Everett Wednesday to be treated at the hospital for gastritis. He will be under the care of Dr. Mead.
disease, tyhoid Wicklof, Mrs. Social and Personal Items - Mrs. Wicklof residing near Edgecomb is quite sick with typhoid fever.
editorial   Editorial
    A reader of the Globe has handed us a clipping from a paper published in one of the middle states, being a letter describing a trip from Anoka MN to the Pacific coast. The article is headed, "Oregon as I found It", but it has even made to say about Washington than our sister state to the south. It is such a piece of reading as a newspaperman can with difficulty read without answering it, and yet it is one of those things that are hard to answer because one finds it difficult to keep one's temper under perfect control while doing so. We had intended to print only a sentence here and there from the letter, but we believe that our readers will find the letter very interesting reading as a sample of what some people think of us that we will give them the benefit of the whole production.
'OREGON AS I FOUND IT'

    I started from Anoka August 1st and went out on the Northern Pacific and returned by the Union Pacific. I took in the wheat fields of the Red River country as we passed on to Fargo. These wheat fields are not extra this year as there are no crops worth speaking of west of Fargo.
    From Bismark to Billings the country is so poor that a Boyd county farmer would not accept it as a gift, and is as near a desert as anything I have ever seen. From Billings to Salt Lake, a distance of five or six hundred miles running north and south, running west of the Cascade mountains five hundred miles west of Billings, in fact clear to the north line of the state of Washington, the country is nothing but a sand pile covered by a lot of sage brush. I will defy any man to find one single blade of grass in the whole country nor at least six hundred miles square. It is not a tough country, but a pure sandy desert.
    Spokane is a fine city, consisting of seventy thousand inhabitants however it must be remembered that Spokane is a mining not an agricultural town. A dry canyon runs through the middle of the city that is six hundred feet wide and one hundred feet deep, cutting the city in two.
    Railroad companies, etc. print books to entice people to go out there but they will have to go on printing books for the next century before the people of this state will bite at their bait.
    The sandy desert is the home of the hot winds which, together with the alkali water would kill a cast iron man.
    The irrigated wheat fields west of the Rocky mountains would not average five bushels to the acre and I saw hundreds of acres that could not be cut as the the straw was not over six inches long. It would take a ripe scholar to talk Oregon, Idaho, or Washington to me, nor would I accept the best of their lands as a gift. The trees in their orchards which are ten to twelve years old are so small that a man standing on the ground can reach the top of them. The fruit amounts to nothing.
    Half the wheat that is raised by irrigation west of the Rockies does not ripen hard enough to make flour hence they grind it up and use it for pig feed. The great forest that they howl so much about is a narrow strip of timber along the coast.
    The wagon roads of Washington, Oregon and Idaho are all chopped up very fine by the travel and when a wagon is moving along any of these roads you can see the cloud of dust, which arises for miles and miles.
    My advise to the Boyd county farmers is. "Do not allow any of the land sharks of the west to draw you into the net." for further information call on
J.E. SMITH
editorial 2nd part
    Were it not that the letter is so far-fetched as to be really humourous. It would be exasperating. It really needs an answer, for nobody can believe it, try how hard he may. To Mr. Smith there is absolutely no country west of Anoka. For the hundreds of miles ..... miles and you will not find a blade of grass, nothing but sand; again another dreary stretch with nothing but sage brush, and then, why didn't he way that there was nothing but water for thousands of miles. Not to lead our own temper into temptation, we shall quote largely from official records. Mr. Smith says our wheat is only good for pig feed. Of course, the point with the wheat raiser is not what his wheat is used for but what it will bring him in revenue. "The yield of wheat puts the state of Washington in the lead of all the states of the Union, the last crop reaching the wonderful average of 28.1 bushels per acre. This is conclusive proof that in the soil of the state are stored the best possible elements for the production of wheat." "Probably more farmers in Washington have reached a position of independence raising of wheat than from any other industry."
    The writer says that the fruit trees do not grow to any such height here as in the east. "The fruit amounts to nothing." We have yet to hear of the man who raised fruit trees for the wood there is in them. It is the fruit he is after. How about the fruit? "Eminent horticultural authorities have placed themselves on record by stating that in certain sections of eastern Washington are grown to a greater perfection than in any other part of the United States. The high coloring, size and quality of the fruit amazes our expert promologists of the east." "For the successful culture of all the small fruits, the west side leads. The berries of Western Washington, especially the raspberry, are making a reputation for this section throughout the eastern states on account of their high quality."
    Our great forests is nothing but a narrow strip "The reader is probably familiar with the fact that white man found about one-half of the surface of the state of Washington covered with the primeval forests in all their grandour. With yearly increasing number they have continued to slaughter the giant timber and convert it into building material, and yet the vast supply has been cut only around the edges". The logging camps and mills of the state employ 80,000 men. Almost $50,000,000 is paid annually in wages to men employed in the forest industry. Last year 1,325,324,906 feet of lumber was shipped by water and rail from the state of Washington. And this does not include the enormous quantity of shingles and lath shipped from this state. The total product of the shingle mills of the state last year was 5,759,640,000 shingles, and there were 198,808,551 laths. It's a well known fact that Washington leads the world in the production shingles. These facts will be found stated in the published report of the Washington Bureau of Statistics for 1905.
    But what is the use of meeting such argument. The continually growing population of the Pacific Northwest is a clear indication of the advantages of the country. This should be said for Mr. Smith that it is a fortunate thing both for Washington and for his own state that there are some who think as he does, but opinion should not be allowed to find us to facts.
marriage Swinnerton, C. F.
Fuller, Mae
Social and Personal Items - C. F. Swinnerton of Monroe, son of M. Swinnerton and well known here, arrived with his bride Monday for a few days visit with relatives. Mr. Swinnerton was married to Miss Mae Fuller of Monroe last week at the bride's home at Monroe. They returned to their home yesterday afternoon.
move Mapes, Minnie Social and Personal Items - Miss Minnie Mapes left yesterday for Vashon Island where will make her home with relatives.
of interest   Getchell Happenings - Cougars are plentiful in the woods east of Getchell. Mrs. Kelly saw a large one in the road last evening as she was returning from one of her neighbors.




Volume XIV Number 39 - Friday, 13 October 1905
Official Paper of Marysville

HEADLINES

Admissions to the Fair
Advertised Letters
Condensed County News
Cures Winter Cough
Elon Turner Dead
Ernest Barkhausen Loses an Arm
Franchise is Amended
Getchell Happenings
Mr. Spithill Plans New Addition
Round About News Item
The county Strong Box
The Last round
The Week in Tulalip

EXTRACTED EVENTS

Type Names
Event
accident, logging   Stimson's Crossing - Two men working in the woods bringing in bolts to Kennedy's mill and a valuable team owned by Mr. Kennedy had a narrrow escape Friday morning. A tree fell and struck the sled to which the team was hitched and broke it to pieces, the horses receiving no injuries. The teamster who was on the sled at the time of the tree falling, jumped off just in time to save his live.
accident, railroad Barkhausen, Ernest Ernest Barkhausen Loses an Arm
    Ernest Barkhausen met with a sad accident last Friday evening. In company with other boys he was in the vicinity of the depot waiting for the train to bring the daily papers. One of the boys jumped into one of the cars of a freight train and called upon Ernest to follow. He was about to do so when the car door of which he took hold moved causing him to fall. At the same time the train started moving. The wheels passed over his right arm near the shoulder. He was taken to Everett where the arm was amputated, it being so badly crushed that there was no possibility of saving it.
    He is getting along remarkably well, caused by his remarkable grit. Being unusually fond of study, he is determined to secure a god education, and thus minimize the importance of the loss of his arm.
crime Howard, Robert State News in Brief - The home of Robert Howard in Oakdale was dynamited at 2 o'clock Wednesday morning supposedly by enemies of Mrs. Howard. It was only by a miracle that the occupants escaped death.
death Morgan, J. H. State News in Brief - J. H. Morgan is dead at Sunnyside. He was at one time stage driver for the old California Stage Company, and drove the last stage into Salem, Oregon before the railroad was finished.
death Turner, Elon Elon Turner Dead
    The home of Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Turner was saddened during the week by the death of their eight year old son Elon Myers Turner last Wednesday evening at *;40 o'clock. Death was caused by appendicitis. He suffered an attack of it about two weeks ago but recovered and went back to school. On Monday of last week the trouble came on again and on Tuesday morning he was removed to an Everett hospital for an operation. The physicians found his condition so complicated and his constitution so weak from the effect of the decease that they could only partially perform the operation. At one time it was thought that he might recover, the operation giving temporary relief until another could be performed.
    Elon was born at Idaho Springs, Colorado, and was 8 years old April 26th last.
    The funeral will be held this after noon from the Congregational church. The family have the profound sympathy of the whole community in there bereavement.
death, logging Rose, William Stimson's Crossing - William Rose, employed as signal man by the Snohomish Logging company in there camp near Snohomish was killed yesterday morning through the breaking of a cable, which struck him in the back breaking it. The deceased was 16 years old.
move Lomeland, Oscar This Week in Tulalip - Mr. Oscar Lomeland went to Everett Saturday nite on the Goldfinch. Mr. Lomeland is looking after his transportation and saying "farewell" preparatory to sailing for his home in Norway.
School Barkhousen, Earnest School News - Earnest Barkhousen, who has been absent from school on account of a serious accident which resulted in the amputation of his right arm is improving. Some of his classmates are planning to visit him next Saturday.
Steilacoom   State News in Brief - Twelve hundred patients were treated in the Western Washington hospital for the insane at Steilacoom during the year ending September 30 (1905). Of these 313 were received since the beginning of the fiscal year. During the year 116 were discharged as cured.
Tulalip Terry, Eunice This Week in Tulalip - Our new Assistant Matron, Miss Eunice Terry, reported here last Saturday and has assumed the duties of her position. Miss Terry is from Utah.




Volume XIV Number 40 - Friday, 20 October 1905
Official Paper of Marysville

HEADLINES

A.Y.L.I. Club
Advertised Letters
Call for Bids
Condensed County News
Final Action is Taken
Getchell Happenings
In Memoriam
Kellog Marsh News
Ordinance No. 123
Plans maturing for the Big Mill
Round About News Item
School News
The Last Round
The Week in Tulalip
Water Mains Now Ready to Go In

EXTRACTED EVENTS

Type Names
Event
anniversary Nielsen, Niels Kellog Marsh News - There was a small party at Mr. and Mrs. Niels Nielsen's home on Wednesday, the day being the twenty-first anniversary of their wedding day.
crime Barker, Steve County News - Steve Barker, convicted of influencing his young wife to lead a life of shame, has been sentenced to five years at hard labor in the Walla Walla penitentiary.
death Holcomb, M. C. State News in Brief - M. C. Holcomb of Chehalis was killed Tuesday through the discharge of a gun he was cleaning.
death McCaulley, James County News - James McCaulley of Arlington took his own life Sunday night by firing a bullet through his brain. The act was caused by despondency and suffering owing to asthma and partial paralysis. The deceased was a man 69 years old.
death Turner, Elon In Memoriam Elon Turner, son of Neighbor A. S. Turner of Cedar Stump Camp, No. 746, Woodmen of the World.
Whereas, the Supreme Ruler in His Infinite wisdom has seen fit to remove from this earthly forest our esteemed Neighbor's son, Elon Turner.
Resolved, that we, the members of Cedar Stump Camp do hereby extend our heartfelt sympathy in this their hour of grief.
Fraternally summited in Love, Honor and Remembrance.
Wm. Perkins
J. H. Hagadorn
Oswold Chartier.
death, mill Neeley, J. H. State News in Brief - J. H. Neeley, a planer in the St. Paul and Tacoma mill at Tacoma, was killed Tuesday morning through the bursting of a big flywheel.
marriage Matts, F. J.
Crowell, Mrs. M. E.
Social and Personal Items - F. J. Matts of this city and Mrs. M. E. Crowell of Uplands, south California, were united in marriage on the twelfth just by Rev. Lingerfelter of Christian church in Seattle. As soon as the furniture arrives for the cottage Mr. Matts has just finished, Mr. and Mrs. Matts will be at home to their friends on Fourth street.
move Allen, Mrs. Geo. The Week in Tulalip - Mrs. Geo. Allen and sons, Eldon and Lyle, moved to Marysville. Thursday, so that the boys might attend the public school. Tulalip is sorry to lose them and will miss them very much.
move Morrison, Mrs. A. J. Social and Personal Items - Mrs. A. J. Morrison and her daughter Mae leave today for Griffin Lake, M.C. to make their future home there. Mr. Morrison is now station agent of the Canadian Pacific railway at that place.
move Reynolds, Olga Social and Personal Items - Miss Olga Reynolds' parents arrived last week from Nebraska to make their home and they are now located in the Poland cottage




Volume XIV Number 41 - Friday, 27 October 1905
Official Paper of Marysville

HEADLINES

Advertised Letters
Call for Bids
Church Improvements Completed
City Council
Condensed County News
Doings of the Woman's club
Getchell Happenings
Norumtown News
Plont Meets with Accident
Round About News Item
State's License Money
The Desparate Situation in Russia
The Week in Tulalip
Watermains Completed to-day
Wm. Guy to Build

EXTRACTED EVENTS

Type Names
Event
accident, mill   Condensed County News - The night watchman at the Ford Shaw Lumber Company's mill at Snohomish, Dempster by name, was caught in a pulley last Tuesday night, and so badly injured that his heart and lungs were exposed. The man was alone, having started the machinery while cleaning up, and was found by some boys about ten o'clock. The injured man was removed to the hospital with chances against his recovery.
accident, mill Plont, F. B. Plont Meets with Accident
F. B. Plont while working on his mill site on the waterfront met with a painful accident Saturday. While one of the men was driving a stake with the side of a double-bitted axe, Mr. Plont was standing directly in front of him, when the axe came loose from the handle and struck him just above the right knee inflicting a painful but not serious flesh wound. Mr. Munn took several stitches in the cut and reports the patient getting along nicely under the circumstances.
birth Wilcox, baby boy Social and Personal Items - Mrs. I. Asbery returned Wednesday morning from a week's stay in Everett with her daughter, Mrs. Frank Wilcox. Mr. and Mrs. Wilcox became the parents of a little boy about two weeks ago
death Christenson, sister Stimson's Crossing - Mr. Christenson received the sad news Tuesday of the death of his sister in Minnesota. She was also a sister of C. Christenson of Everett, who left Tuesday night to attend the funeral.
death Sebbas, infant daughter Social and Personal Items - The infant daughter of C. Sebbas died last Monday night from convultions.
family Anderson, Mrs. Social and Personal Items - Mrs. Anderson, mother of O. L. Anderson, arrived - Wednesday after a three month's visit in Nebraska. She was accompanied by her little granddaughter, Frances Oberg.
move Allen, Mrs. George The Week in Tulalip - Mrs. George Allen and sons, after a few days trial of living in town again decided that the country is best after all and moved back to Tulalip last Wednesday.
of interest   State's License Money
The investigation made by state treasurer Mills and his deputies has disclosed the fact that, in accordance with the law passed in 1888, which gives the state 10 percent of all moneys received from liqueur licenses, the state has $104,899.58 coming to it. There is the due the state $1,040 from Marysville.





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These pages were extracted and placed on line by Darilee Bednar
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