MARYSVILLE GLOBE
The Official Newspaper for
Marysville WA

JULY 1913

Volume 22, Number 22, Friday, July 4, 1913 ... $1.00 a Year in Advance

HEADLINES:

Marysville Wins in Ninth Inning
A Case in Arithmetic
Matrons' Silver Medal Contest
A List of the New Library Books
Popular Y.M.C.A. Worker Coming
Silver Wedding
Sunny Side
A Most Worthy Philanthropy
Bible Class Give Social
A Letter to the Boys and Girls

EXTRACTED ITEMS

Type Names
Event
accident - horse Goodman, Frank
Local and Personal - While breaking a cayuse to drive last Saturday, Frank Goodman, the 13 year old son of W. P. Goodman, was thrown from the cart and his leg broken. He was brought to Dr. Thompson's office, and the Dr. took him to the Providence Hospital in Everett for an X ray examination. He is improving rapidly and will soon be about again.
anniversary Anderson, Lars
Silver Wedding
A pleasant surprise was tendered Mr. and Mrs. Lars Anderson last Friday June 17th. the occasion being the twenty-fifth anniversary of their wedding. A most enjoyable day was spent by the guests and many beautiful gifts were presented to Mr. and Mrs. Anderson. A sumptous repast was served. The out of town guests were Mr. and Mrs. C. Christensen of Spokane. Mr. and Mrs. Alrich Anderson and Mrs. Wm. E. Stout of Everett.
death Haggart, Heinry
In the matter of the estate of Heinry Haggart (Henry Heegard) deceased... C. H. Quast, Administrator
divorce Butler, Joseph
Butler, Martha N.
Summons... Joseph Butler, Plaintiff vs. Martha N. Butler, Defendant
divorce Murray, Jean
Murray, David
Summons... Jean Murray, Plaintiff vs David Murray, Defendant
marriage Campell, Dora (sic)
Local and Personal - Miss Georgia Swinnerton attended the wedding of Miss Dora Campell at Seattle Sunday.
move Gipple, A. Otto
Local and Personal - We received a card from Mrs. A. Otto Gipple at Alameda CA asking us to send the Globe to her address there. Mr. Gipple has a position as ship carpenter in the yards there, and they are very much pleased with the place.
move Stuth, Frank
Local and Personal - Mr. and Mrs. Frank Stuth returned this week from Idaho they have spent the last four months. Frank was looking over the country with a prospect to buying a ranch, but he says the best is already taken and the rest don't amount to much. He is well satisfied with Marysville.
move Walchrist, Ray
Local and Personal - Mr. and Mrs. Ray Walchrist and son moved to Machias Tuesday where they will reside in the future. Mr. Walchrist has a position in the O. K. Mill in that place.

Volume 22, Number 23, Friday, July 11, 1913 ... $1.00 a Year in Advance

HEADLINES:

Marysville and Everett Win Three Games Each
Notice to Contractors
Getchell Road
Peace Through Fear
The Matron's Silver Medal Contest
Y" Silver Medal Contest
My Trip to Gettysburg
Do Not Set Fires
Black Diamond Coming July 20

EXTRACTED ITEMS

Type Names
Event
born Berry, Turner Dennison
Local and Personal - Born 10 Jul 1913 to Mr. and Mrs. F. K. Berry, of Vancouver, BC, an eight and a half pound boy. Grandpa S. T. Smith paid the Globe office a visit and informed us that he felt rather decrepit. Turner Dennison Berry is the young arrival's name
death Baker, Clifton
Local and Personal - Miss Gertrude Smith attended the funeral of Clifton Baker at Everett on Tuesday of this week. He was a graduate of St. Dominic's Academy and was a former classmate of Miss Smith's.
marriage Campbell, Dora
Davis, Charles
Local and Personal - We have received a card announcing the marriage of Miss Dora Campbell to Mr. Charles Davis at Seattle, Sunday, June 29th. Mrs. Davis has been the Principal of the Marysville High School for a number of years, and was an excellent teacher. The Globe and her many friends here extend their best wishes and hope that the future holds a great deal of happiness for Mr. and Mrs. Davis.
military
My Trip to Gettysburg (As Related by the Marysville Veteran Who Was Present at the Reunion)
I shall not say that I made my start from Marysville, but from Everett, on the evening of June 26th. An auto decorated with flags took us to the depot a little early as the citizens wished to bid us God-speed on our journey. We had not been at the depot long before the people began to arrive bringing arms full of flowers as a gift to those who were starting on a long journey to the place where we had fought and left behind so many of our comrads on "That Long Sleep from whence there was no awakening."
After the flowers were presented, songs were sung, cheers were given and finally there sounded to arms the bugle and drum. Then could be heard the puff of the old engine which was to take us over the mountains. Farewells were said and we hardly knew whether we would see the good, old State of Washington again. Finally all was aboard for Gettysburg.
On the train were the Adjutant General, the Governor and several of the state officials. The Governor presented each one of us with a beautiful badge of the State of Washington.
Our train consisted of nine sleepers, two dining cars, one baggage car, all of which were first class. We also had a doctor, a graduate nurse and everything necessary for emergencies. Each man had a berth of his own and plenty of room. The doctor was a jolly fellow, and it was plainly apparent that the nurse would be the life of the train after we had become better acquainted. Oh yes, the cigars presented to me by Hilton & Witt were a most acceptable gift and furnished a number of us with a good smoke. Going through the mountains was pretty cold, but we were supplied with extra bedding and consequently got along nicely.
We arrived in Spokane at 9:30 the next morning and there the Governor left us, after a good speech and many a hearty wish that we would have a good time.
Of course we had breakfast by this time and the bill-of-fare consisted of: strawberries, oatmeal mush, bacon and eggs, fried liver, fried fish, fried potatoes, hot buns, butter, tea, milk, coffee and cream.
The adjutant General still went with us to the state line and there left us, bidding us goodbye and great cheering and hand-shaking. And we thanking him for his kindness, started on our second day's journey.
I shall not give any more of the trip but in the next issue of the paper will devote to the scenes and sayings of Gettysburg.
move Hjort, Fred
Local and Personal - Fred Hjort, who left last week for British Columbia in the interest of the John McMaster Shingle Co., has ordered the Globe sent to his address there. Fred is a hustler and will make good.

Volume 22, Number 24, Friday, July 18, 1913 ... $1.00 a Year in Advance

HEADLINES:

Marysville to Celebrate Labor Day
Fined for Shooting Birds on Reservation
Former Franklin boy Making Good
Sunny Side
My trip to Gettysburg
Graff & Bancroft to Do Street Work
Notice to Farmers
Rebekahs Initiate Officers
School Report
Notice of Hearing Final Account

EXTRACTED ITEMS

Type Names
Event
accident - mill Stanton, Ed
Local and Personal - Ed. Stanton injured his foot while working at the "Big Mill" last week, and was forced to remain idle for a few days.
born Triber, baby girl
Local and Personal - Born Friday 11 Jul 1913 to Mr. and Mrs. Lee Triber, of Tacoma, a daughter.
crime Nyman, William
Fined for Shooting Birds on Reservation
William Nyman, an employee at the Cobb & Healy Logging co., took his 22 rifle out at noon hour one day last week to while away the short rest by shooting birds. He shot a couple of those little brown birds, and a stranger, who happened to be a deputy game warden, placed him under arrest, took him to Everett and fined him $5.00 and costs. Now, this may have been strictly according to Hoyle, but, nevertheless, we think it was a little hard on poor Bill, inasmuch as he did not know it was an offense to shoot birds. We think that if this over-zealous game warden would take a trip north of town, he would find more suitable subject for arrest. We have been informed by various parties that grouse, pheasants and other real game birds are being shot up in that vicinity; In fact, every day you can hear the report of shot guns in the woods and fields. Better look for the real offenders Mr. Game Warden.
military
My Trip to Gettysburg (As Related by the Marysville Veteran Who Was Present at the Reunion)
In the last issue of the paper, I agreed to tell you about the city of Gettysburg and life in camp.
We arrived in Gettysburg about 7:30 am June 30 very tired and dusty. After a lunch was given us, we marched to our camp, which was all ready for us.
Each State had a street by itself, and ours was very nicely situated on a gently slope with shade trees at the head of it, and marked "State of Washington, 19th Street, West.:
Each tent was large enough for eight cots, each of which was supplied with two blankets. Two lanterns, two wash basins and two large buckets for water made up our tent furnishings. So you see, we did not have to lie on the ground as some of the papers erroneously stated. Everthing was far ahead of our expectations. The cook-house was at the head of the street, well equipped with dishes, and will say here that we had plenty to eat and it was good enough for anyone.
After getting our things in our tent and cleaning up a little, four of us went up to the city, which was about three-quarters of a mile from camp, and there hired an auto to visit the great Battlefield.
One of the most interesting places in the world is the Battle-field of Gettysburg. Lying in a rolling country, dotted with conical, elongated and wooded ..., and with a range of the Blue Mountains distinct in the west, the Battle-field is picturesque in its natural features. It is now marked by 348 monuments and memorials, costing over $3,000,000 and the entire grounds is intersected by 60 miles of road ways, costing $8,000 per mile. It is the most finished and most attractive of the Government parks.
We started down Lee's Avenue, each avenue is named for a General, and our guide told us of the different places, where each General fought. There is a monument every little ways, and a tablet for each regiment, so you can guess that there was a great deal for us to see. ,
On our ride, we passed Lee's Headquarters then Mead's Headquarters; saw Culp's Hill, HIghwater Mark, Spangler's Spring, Devil's Den, Little Round Top, and the Cemetery. No one can tell of the beauty of the Cemetery where sleeps our dead. It is a solomn place and we could not hellp but remove our hats as we passed along; and how glad we felt to see how much had been done for our comrades who had laid down their lives for their country!
After we left the Cemetery, we went to the field where I fought the second day. We also went to Gen. Sickles' head-quarters and shook hands with the old general and stayed with him for a short time. We then moved toward Camp.
It is eleven miles around the Battlefield, and a grand sight from start to finish.
move Wilcox, Mrs. L. N.
Mrs. L. N. Wilcox and daughter, Miss Ethel, left Wednesday for Issiquah WA, where they intend to make their future home.
people McGowan, H. A.
Local and Personal - Marysville has a truly wonderful violinist in Mr. H. A. McGowan, of the Star Theatre. While only a boy in years, he plays like a master, and shows that he has received careful training, besides being naturally gifted. His rendition of "Sing Me to Sleep", that old favorite, was in our estimation really fine, and could hardly have been improved upon.
people Tooker, Dr.
Local and Personal - Dr. Tooker, who has taken over the practice of Dr. Munn, has been having a hard tussle with Rheumatism. He has now gained the ascendance over that tough old customer, and will be found in his office, the one formerly occupied by Dr. Munn, on Front Street.
visit Johnson, B. C.
Local and Personal - B. C. Johnson, of Kendrick ID, former Editor of the Globe is a visitor in this city this week, and is also visiting his brother-in-law, Frank Tallman, at the Crossing.

Volume 22, Number 25, Friday, July 25, 1913 ... $1.00 a Year in Advance

HEADLINES:

Finds His Money Through Globe Ad
Locomobile Makes Fast Time Over Rural HIghways
Water Notice
McRae Elected President of Kennel Club
Report of Count of R.F.D. No. 1, Marysville, for June 1913
Why Buy Advertised Goods?
Notice
Valuable Dog Shot Saturday Night
Watch for the Labor Day Program
Kellogg Marsh
Game Laws
Contractors Begine Work on Streets
Notice to Householders and Property Owners
Narrow Escape from Death
Ed Schaefer Making Good at Anacortes

EXTRACTED ITEMS

Type Names
Event
crime - dog
Valuable Dog Shot Saturday
Saturday evening, some low down galoot shot "Jakey". John Thorsen's trick dog, with a rifle. The bullet struck him in the hip making an ugly wound. Dr. Ross, the horse doctor, was called at once, and hopes of his recovery are entertained. The only fear is that the hot weather may cause blood poison. Jakey is the smartest dog in town, and never did anyone any harm. He has performed on the stage several times and his tricks are truly wonderful. John is back in Michigan visiting his parents, but we wouldn't be suprised to see him back here any day to look for the one who shot his dog.
death Glatz, Herman
Narrow Escape From Death
While working at the McMater Mill Thursday afternoon Herman Glatz met with what might have been a fatal accident. He was cleaning out one of the elevators and upon rising from his knees, his head came in contact with the cut-off saw, making an ugly looking wound. He was taken at once to Dr. Tooker's office and upon examination, it was found that the skull had been cut, narrowly missing the brain. The cut was fully four inches long. Glatz is a married man, living at Noruntown, and has several young children.
move Robinson, Ellsworth
Local and Personal - Ellsworth Robinson left Friday evening for Amboy MN where he will visit relatives during the remainder of the summer. When he comes back, he will go directly to Lynn, where he has secured a position to teach.
people McNell, M. A.
Finds His Money Through Globe Ad
M. A. McNeill, a rancher living north of town, lost two twenty dollar bills one day last week while on his way to deposit the same in the Marysville State Bank. He searched high and low along the road for it, but to no avail and as a last resort, (with little hope of ever finding it) he placed an ad in the Globe, stating that he had lost the money and asking the finder to return it to him. Tuesday evening of this week, W. H. Morgan, foreman of the T. D. Davies' ranch, brought him the two twenties, having found it above the road. He saw the ad in the Globe and knew at once where to take it. Mr. McNeil, was naturally greatly pleased and although Mr. Morgan did not want any reward for returning the money, he pressed a $5.00 note into his hand. Who can say that there are no honest people left in the world.
people Schafer, Ed
Ed Schaefer Making Good at Anacortes
This is Schaefer, one of the grandest little baseball players on the Anchors baseball team. Schaefer came here this season from Marysville and has proven the best all around man for the Anchors. He is change pitcher, general utility player, secretary of the baseball club and is captain of the Moose baseball team. That is a string of positions for a young man to handle but Schaefer has the head and the enthusiasm so he gets by in great shape (Anacortes American)
Introduction January February March April
May June July August September
October November December Snohomish Index

These pages were extracted and placed on line by Darilee Bednar
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