MARYSVILLE GLOBE
The Official Newspaper for
Marysville WA

JUNE 1913

Volume 22, Number 18, Friday, June 6, 1913 ... $1.00 a Year in Advance

HEADLINES:

missing front page

EXTRACTED ITEMS

Type Names
Event

(everyone healthy and happy and crime free plus lots of high school pictures)

Volume 22, Number 19, Friday, June 13, 1913 ... $1.00 a Year in Advance

HEADLINES:

Old Soldiers Are Made Happy
It's a Bear"
One Boy Blinded One Boy is Dead
Men at English Camp on Strike
Sunny Side
Notice
West Seattle Coming Sunday
Local and Personal

EXTRACTED ITEMS

Type Names
Event
death Smith, Harris
One Boy Blinded One Boy is dead
At Anacortes on Memorial Day in a baseball game, two boys of that city were victims of most deplorable and horrible accidents. The young fellows were Harris Smith, aged 17, and Milo Strock. The first is dead and if the latter lives he will go through life devoid of both sight and hearing. Both were participants in the game. Young Strock was struck in the eye by a pitched ball. The blow reduced all tissues of the eye to a pulp. On closer examination it was found that the sight was hopelessly injured and hearing so affected that ultimate deafness must result if the victim survives his terrible injuries, which is doubtful. The dead boy, Harris Smith was struck by a ball thrown to first base, the ball falling at the base of the skull. No immediate attention was given the matter and the boy staid in the game to the finish. However, when he reached home and the pain made medical examination necessary, it was found that he was suffering from concussions of the brain. In spite of all efforts his death resulted from the injury. (Times)
military
Old Soldiers Are Made Happy.
H. C. Henry, capitalist, himself a veteran of the civil war, yesterday made it possible for the forty-six veterans of the battle of Gettysburg not provided for under the state appropriation to attend the semi-centennial celebration of the battlefield July 1 to 4. He generous gift of $5,000 will make it possible for everyone of the 164 survivors living in Washington to answer "present" when the old guard faces roll call. Because the state legislature at its last session miscalculated the number of Gettysburg survivors in Washington an appropriation was made which would cover the transportation expenses to and from the battlefield of 118 men. There are more than 200 federal and confederate veterans eligible to make the trip from this state. One hundred and sixty-four made application and their records were found satisfactory. (P.I.)
wildlife
It's a Bear
Saturday, June 7, a large black bear, which had been driven to civilization by dogs, boys or scarcity of food, was seen in the vicinity of Sixth, Seventh, and Union streets about 7 am. Teddy went through fences just "like nuthin;"' didn't attack anyone; galloped lazily over to Eight Street paths and made his way for the wilderness. Mrs. Kruse reports two missing pigs. Poor Teddy.

Volume 22, Number 20, Friday, June 20, 1913 ... $1.00 a Year in Advance

HEADLINES:

Tragic Death of (Thure) Tory Nelson
More Cement Sidewalks for Marysville
W.C.T.U. Convention Report
West Seattle Is Easy for the Pirates
Baseball
Delegates Return from Grand Lodge
Kellogg Marsh
Sunny Side
Promise of an Auto Causes Medical Lake Girl's Death of Joy
What Happened to Jones
Card of Thanks
Turkey Trotting Causes Inflamation of Leg Muscles Says Doctor

EXTRACTED ITEMS

Type Names
Event
death
Local and Personal - Mrs. Fred Harrington and Mrs. Baumgartner have received word of the recent death of their sister who lived in Germany.
death - mill Nelson, Tory
Tragic Death of (Thure) Tory Nelson
Tory Nelson, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Nelson, of Beech Street, met death by drowning while working on the boom at the Mutual Mill last Monday. The terrible tragedy must have happened about noon, as he was seen working on the logs at a quarter to twelve, and his watch, which was found in his pocket, had stopped at twenty minutes past twelve. Tory was a first class boom man, and was taking Jack Stahl's place for the day. Jack having hurt his hand. In the afternoon, Guy Hazeltine, foreman of the mill, noticed that Tory was not at work, but supposed that he had gone home to dinner, and had probably been taken ill. He and his son, Ralph, did the boom work that afternoon. That evening the pike pole which Tory had used was found among the logs and it was then that the men suspisioned that something was wrong. A messenger was sent to Tory's home, but he had not been there since morning. The pond was dragged until late into the night but no trace of the body was found. Tuesday morning, after fifteen minutes work, they found him at the bottom under the logs. It is thought that he lost his balance and fell in, coming up under the logs, and was unable to find his way to open water. Others think that he must have fell and struck his head on a log. He was able to swim and had often scrambled out after a ducking. It is evident that he made a desperate effort to get out, as his hands, arms and face were found to be badly bruised and scratched from coming in contact with the rough bark on the logs. The mills were all running along the waterfront at the time, and the noise which they make would render it impossible for anyone to hear a shout for help. Tory was one of our most popular young men. He was industrious and trustworthy, and had many friends in Marysville. He will be missed terribly by his aged parents and a host of friends. The funeral will be held Sunday at 2:00 pm from the Methodist Church, Rev. Anderson, of Everett, officiating.
disease
Turkey Trotting Causes Inflammation of Leg Muscles Says Doctor
Philadelphia, June 7 - Medical men in this city have been called upon to treat many society women and men with an inflammation of the thigh caused by excessive turkey trotting. The surgeons who have studied the muscular affection say the disease is due to what they term 'sartoritis' which gets it name from the longest muscle in the body, the sartorius which extends from the pelvic bone to attachment at the inner side of the knee. Invariably the patients have shown physicians their limbs and this muscle was so badly strained that they were advised to keep off their feet until the injury had healed. The women were all affected on the right leg, while the men were strained on the left leg. Surgeons say that this is because the turkey trot is a one-step affair and following the steps of the dance, the women bear down on one side and the men on the other (Exchange)
disease - smallpox Moore, A. R.
What Happened to Jones
We have received numerous inquiries the past month of "What Happened to Jones.: The following paragraph from the Granite Falls Post may shed some light upon the subject: A. R. Moore is suffering from an attack of smallpox at the home of his parents. Under the latest rule of the state board of health cases of this nature are no longer quarantined; but a smallpox placard is put on the building and the patient is confined to the premises. Mr. Moore's many friends here hope for his early recovery.
move Gipple, A. Otto
A. Otto Gipple and family left this week for Eureka CA, where they expect to remain indefinitely.
visit Austin, Alice
Mrs. Alice Austin and little daughter, Edith of Portales NM and son Ray of Long Beach CA, arrived in Marysville Tuesday morning for a visit with her mother, sisters and brother, the Crains.

Volume 22, Number 21, Friday, June 27, 1913 ... $1.00 a Year in Advance

HEADLINES:

Marysville Wins in 16th
Wooden Wedding
Sunny Side
Gettysberg Veterans
Obituary - Sanders
Fire Destroys the Ebey Mill
Obituary - Nelson
Matts - James
Alumni Excursion

EXTRACTED ITEMS

Type Names
Event
accident - mill Kinney, Allan
Allan Kinney, while working at a shingle saw at Montgomery's mill last Monday morning, had his left hand badly cut. He hurried to Dr. Thompson's office and had the cut dressed. It is probable that his index finger will be useless.
born Nelson, baby girl
While attending the funeral of his brother here, Ole Nelson received a message stating that a little daughter had arrived at his home in Tenino.
death Jimmicum, son
The three year old son of Martin Jimmicum, living on the Tulalip Indian Reservation, met death by drowning in a well last Sunday. The funeral was held on Tuesday.
death Nelson, Thure
Obituary - Nelson
Ture Nelson was born in Sweden 12 Dec 1888 and died in Marysville WA 16 Jun 1913 being at the time of his death 24 yrs 6 mos and 4 dys. He came to America with is parents in 1891 and resided at Bancroft IA until about five years ago, when they moved to Marysville. He leaves to mourn his untimely death his parents Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Nelson, of this city, three brothers, Henry W. Nelson of Berthold ND, Nick Nelson, of Tacoma, and Ole Nelson of Tinino, also three sisters, Mrs. C. I. Linn of Coulee ND, Mrs. J. H. Peterson of Des Lacs, ND and Miss Hilma A. Nelson, of Seattle, besides many relatives and friends. The children were all at the funeral excepting Mrs. Linn, who was unable to make the long journey. The funeral sermon was preached by Rev. Anderson of Everett, who gave it first in the Scandinavian, then in the English language. A large concourse of people from town and the surrounding country attended to pay their last respects to the memory of one who had always been a good son, a loyal friend and a respected citizen. The local Union of S.W.S.W. & W. of which he was an honored member, attended in a body, and the pall bearers were selected from his fellow workers. A number of beautiful floral wreaths were sent by friends of the deceased and the casket was covered with beautiful flowers. A long line of teams and autos followed the hearse to the I.O.O.F. Cemetery, where interment took place under the direction of Undertaker C. H. Schaefer.
death Sanders, Dorthy E.
Obituary - Sanders
Dorthy E. Sanders, the five months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Sanders, Everett, died Thursday, June 19 and was buried at the I. O.O.F. cemetery here on Saturday, the 21st. Rev. W. W. Switzer preached the funeral sermon at the home: 2526 Hiland St. and Undertaker C. H. Schaefer had charge at the cemetery.
fire
FIRE DESTROYS THE EBEY MILL
Sunday morning about 4:20, Henry Thompson, who was night watch at the Ebey Mill, discovered that the mill was on fire. He blew the whistle as hard as he could, but in a few minutes the whole mill was a solid mass of flames. By the time a crowd had gathered the mill was gone and all energies were bent on saving the dry kiln and water tank. The morning being very still and a heavy rain having fallen the night before. It was not difficult to keep the fire from spreading, so that the kiln full of shingles and the tank were saved. the was $8,000 insurance in the mill and dry kilns so the Mill company will realize about $5,000 insurance, which does not cover the loss by any means, the damage being estimated at $20,000. Messrs. Bertois and Harrington, the owners of the mill, inform us that they will undoubtedly rebuild and possibly make it a combination mill. the Ebey Mill, under the management of the present owners, has been one of the best and steadiest running mills in the country. They have never missed a day when it was possible to run and their payroll has been between $3,000 and $4,000 per month.
marriage Matts, Ventura
James, John A.
Matts - James
A very pretty home wedding took place at 3 o'clock Wednesday afternoon at the home of John H. Matts when Miss Ventura Matts and Mr. John A. James were united in marriage by REv. Clarke. During the rendering of the Lohengrin wedding march by Miss Leila Miller, the couple came to their place under the flora wedding bell and the solemn ceremony was performed. The bride is a splendid young woman, and had but just received her University degree on the same momentous day. The groom is well known among us, having at one time been principal of our High School and is now Principal of the Agricultural college at Rochester WI where they will now make their home. the bride was charmingly attired in white crepe-de-chine with pearl trimming, while the groom tooked his best in the customary black. At the conclusion of the ceremony an informal wedding supper was served to the assembled guests on the spacious porch. The house was tastefully decorated in white with flowers and streamers. On side tables were displayed the many costly and beautiful gifts by which the many friends of the bride had shown their esteem. The above item is taken from the June 19th issue of the Verona Record, published in Vernoa WI. Miss Matts will be remembered by many people in Marysville having lived here with her parents during the summer of 1912. Her father, John H. Matts, younger brother of F. J. Matts, was a large stockholder in the Big Mill; now a prosperous farmer in Verona WI and with whom Golda and Leslie Matts are now visiting.
military
Gettysberg Veterans
Following is a list of the Gettysberg veterans who live in Snohomish County: William Simmons, C. D. Enos, Elisha Cleveland and J. J. Thomkins, Snohomish; R. K. Beecham, R. C. Van Vechten and H.G. York, Everett; D. S. Baker and Bethuel H. Hause, Arlington; David Purkey, Machias; Geo. W. Wonder, Monroe - (Snohomish Advance.) The Advance does not mention Marysville's three veterans, namely: H. C. McGaffey, E. R. Davison and R. R. Wompole. Each one of these were able to furnish proof of their being in the big three day battle, but Mr. McGaffey was the only one of three who was able to go. He left Wednesday evening from Everett with the crowd on the special.


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These pages were extracted and placed on line by Darilee Bednar
Supported by 3rd St. Book Exchange, Marysville WA
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