MARYSVILLE GLOBE
The Official Newspaper for
Marysville WA

June 1917

Volume XXVI Number 20 Friday, June 1, 1917
Official Paper of Marysville

HEADLINES

Contract Let for New Sanitarium
Etiquette of the Flag; Code of Rules
Final Exercises at the Marysville H. S.
Harvest Field Hands Should be Immunized
Member of Well-Known Indian Family is Dead
Military Registration Rules
Red Cross Membership Reaches Total of 265
Registration Day Is to be a Legal Holiday
Soldiers' Graves Are Fittingly Decorated
Y.M.C.A. War Fund is Over-Subscribed
Your Patriotic Duty Buy a Liberty Loan Bond

EXTRACTED EVENTS

Type Names
Event
death Shelton, Ruth Member of Well-Known Indian Family Is Dead
Ruth Shelton, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm Shelton, died at the parental home at Tulalip on Thursday last age fourteen years, the cause of her death being tuberculosis. The funeral was held Saturday afternoon at the Catholic church on the reservation, and was largely attended.
disease typhoid fever Harvest Field Hands Should be Immunized
The Commissioner of the State Board of Health, De. T. D. Tuttle, of Seattle, has sent out an appeal to all who intended to leave the cities and towns to work in the harvest fields to be immunized against typhoid fever. Both of out local physicians, Drs. J. D. Thompson and C. E. Munn, have agreed to co-operate. The appeal is as follows:
"The State of Washington has furnished her full quota for all branches of the army. Our young men have not waited to be conscripted, but have come forward in a manly and heroic manner and offered their services to their country.
"In this world-wide war it is realized that the battle must be fought not only in the trenches but to an equal extent in the harvest field, and to the call for soldiers in the harvest field our State has responded with the same patriotic spirit. The boys and girls of our schools, too young to enlist in the army, are offering their services in the harvest field battle. These soldiers in the harvest field are entitled to and must received the same protection from disease that is furnished those who enter the fighting ranks.
"The first precaution taken with all soldiers entering the army is to render them immune, so far as possible, against disease. Every soldier is immunized against typhoid fever. This point seems to have been overlooked with regard to the soldiers we intend to send into the harvest fields. To neglect this important duty would result in a serious condition.
The water supplies of our cities are constantly guarded, and, as a result, are the purest to be found in any State in the Union. The water supplies of our country districts are very frequently, to say the least, contaminated. People who have been in the habit of drinking pure water are much more susceptible to water-borne diseases than are those who have not been in the habit of using pure water. No boy or girl should go into our harvest fields until he or she has been immunized against typhoid fever. Entering the harvest arm
marriage Zabel, Elsie Local and Personal: Mrs. F. Zabel left for Spokane last Thursday where she attended the wedding of her daughter Miss Elsie Zabel. She will remain a few weeks visiting friends and relatives.
move Kinnear, Mrs. Nellie Local and Personal: Mrs. Nellie Kinnear and daughter Alice leave for Seattle Friday. They will spend the summer in Edmonds and Seattle. Mrs. Kinnear takes the principalship of the Duwamish schools for next year while Miss Alice will attend the State Normal at Bellingham.
move Raymond, Chas. Local and Personal: Chas. Raymond has sold his barber shop in Ballard and is back in Marysville with his family.

Volume XXVI Number 21 Friday, June 8, 1917
Official Paper of Marysville

HEADLINES

Council transacts Routine Business
Enlistments Open for U.S. Marine Corps
Jurors Drawn for June Term of Superior Court
Marysville's Roll of Honor
Officers of Local Red Cross Branch at Everett Meeting
Red Cross Branch Meet to Organize
Red Cross Nurse Returns to Hospital Duty in France
Registration Day Quiet in Marysville
Sanitarium Contract Awarded last Monday.
Sewing for Red Cross to Begin at Once
Slackers
The Farmers and Liberty Loan

EXTRACTED EVENTS

Type Names
Event
birthday Peterson, Mr. Fair View: Mr. and Mrs. Sprague entertained at dinner Monday in honor of the latters' father, Mr. Peterson of Norumtown. The occasion was Mr. Peterson's eighty-first birthday anniversary. Out of town guests were Mr. and Mrs. Albert Peterson and Mr. Mitchel of Everett.
death Husby, Nora Died--At Everett Hospital, June 5, 1917, Miss Nora Husby, aged 18 years, 2 months and 20 days of tuberculosis.
Deceased was born in Yankton county, So. Dak., Mar. 15, 1899, and came to Washington with her parents in 1901. She leaves besides her father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Martin Husby one sister and four brothers.
The funeral was held at the M.E. church at 10 o'clock Thursday morning. Rev. K. R. Gilmer officiating.
Her last words were that she was ready to go when she was called. She also sang these songs, the evening before she passes away: "Nearer My God to thee," "Home, Sweet home" and "My Country 'tis of thee."
marriage Nelson, John and Scott, Luella John Nelson and Miss Luella Scott were married in Everett, Saturday, May 26. Mr. Nelson has lived in this vicinity for many years and Mrs. Nelson has been teaching in the Kellogg Marsh school
move Hewitt, Robert Local and Personal: Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hewitt and son left Tuesday for their former home in Michigan. Their address will be Traverse City. They made many friends during their eight years residence in Marysville, who wish them success in their future years.
move Nelson, Mr. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Nelson and son Chester moved to their new home at Tolt, Washington, Saturday

Volume XXVI Number 22 Friday, June 15, 1917
Official Paper of Marysville

HEADLINES

Additional List of Red Cross Members
An Opportunity of a Lifetime
Death of a Noted Snoqualmie Indian
Grand Lodge I.O.O.F. and Rebekahs at Vancouver
Liberty Loan Bond Campaign Ends Today
Loan Associations in County Number 14
Marysville's Roll of Honor
Memorial Services Held by I.O.O.F. and Rebekahs
President Suzzalo of U. of W. in Everett
Shall a Street Sweeping Machine be Bought by City?
The Kaiser's Prayer
The Red Cross Needs Your Help
The Road to France
To Move to State Street
Widow of Bridge Tender Gets Award of $2000

EXTRACTED EVENTS

Type Names
Event
accident Neilson, Mrs. Nels Kellogg Marsh: Mrs. Nels Neilson, while taking care of Mrs. T. Davies' children of Everett fell and hurt herself quite badly. She was brought home immediately and is much better now.
death Steve, William Death of a Noted Snoqualmie Indian: William Steve, a full-blood Snoqualmie Indian, died Monday June 11, 1917 at the home of Henry Steve, a nephew. He was nearly 100 years old and is the last of the Snoqualmie tribe of Indians which, under the able leadership of Chief Patkanim, took sides with the white people during the early Indian revolt.
The deceased was born near Snoqualmie Falls, where he spent his early childhood and young manhood, learning the usual means of an Indian livelihood. It was there also, that he studied the arts and tactics of Indian warfare, which he later used to great advantage.
After he had finished early training with his fellow tribesmen, and after being disappointed in a love affair, he boarded an ocean-going sailing vessel and worked his way to the Golden Gate as an asst. quarter-master.
After several months' absence, he returned home, only to find his Chief and followers making preparations for war. Wars, and rumors of war were ringing within the hearts of every warrior. Mr. Steve went about his usual ante-bellum days. To his people, he told time and time again, what a wonderful country he had visited. He told of the vast number of people and the immense activity that was taking place in the harbor. But he soon found it difficult to check the war preparations, and it was thru the experiences of his voyage to the Golden Gate City that he became the chief interpreter to Chief Patkanim and the Federal authorities. It was probably thru his narratives, combined with the able leadership of Chief Patkanim that caused the Snoqualmie tribe to cease war preparations against the white settlers and ally with the Federal troops. He served as an interpreter and was a constant aid to his Chief thru the Indian wars that followed. (1853-54).
After the war, he married a Skokomish Indian woman, the surviving widow, she having been purchased by his people for a vast sum of money. After, spending a few years up the Snoqualmie river, and on the Tulalip reservation, he retired to the Skokomish reservation and lived a peaceful life
Four years ago he came to Tulalip to look after his timber hold and some real estate that he had inherited from his brother and nephew.
Having reached an advanced age, his health was failing him. thru the help of his nephew, Henry Steve, every means was used to restore his strong manhood. But in vain.
Mr. Steve was strong-minded, fir in purpose, and was ever a constant help and able counsel to his surviving nephew until the day of his death.
He is survived by his widow, two nephews, Henry Steve, John Albert Steve and a niece, Mrs. Charles Hilliare, all of Tulalip.
Chief Charley Syticub, of the Duwamish tribe, who is 100 years old or more, altho feeble and aged, came from his home in Puyallup, assisted by James Gowdy, a prominent and widely known Puyallup Indian, and paid his last respects to his old boyhood friends.
Seven of the surviving widow's relatives came up from the Skokomish reservation to attend the funeral, and four old-time friends from the Swinomish reservation also came to pay their last tribute to the deceased.
The remains were laid to rest in a massive oak casket, which was enclosed in a solid cement vault. No expense or pains were spared by his nephew, Henry Steve, to do honor to this scion of a great race.
The funeral arrangements were under the direction of Undertaker C. H. Schaefer, who states that the funeral was carried out with greater detail and perhaps at a greater expense than any other he has conducted since he came to Marysville. Henry Steve, the nephew, had great admiration for his aged relative, and did all in his power to prove it.
death Jones, H. E. Widow of Bridge Tender Gets Award of $2,000
Mrs. Charlotte Jones, after some weeks of negotiations with the railroad company and finally beginning suit, was awarded damages by Judge Ralph C. Bell Tuesday in the sum of $2,000 for the death of her husband, H. E. Jones, who was killed early in April by catching his clothes in the drawbridge engine. As the accident was caused by an exposed nut on the shaft there was some blame attached to the company for allowing dangerous conditions to exist, therefore the company's attorneys offered a reasonable settlement and made no contest in open court.
death Local and Personal: Undertaker Schaefer erected yesterday three fine monuments, one for Mrs. Thos. Gash in the Catholic cemetery, one for Harry E. Jones and one for Mrs. Melvin Wolcott in the Odd Fellows cemetery.
move Lane, C. A. Local and Personal: C. A. Lane, who has been employed at the McMaster mill for some months past, resigned his position Tuesday and leave Monday for Spokane, where he will seek employment as saw filer in a regular lumber mill. He makes the change on account of his health.

Volume XXVI Number 23 Friday, June 22, 1917
Official Paper of Marysville

HEADLINES

70,000 Men Wanted for Regular Army
A Red Cross Appeal
Dairymen Form Big County Association
Entertainment Next in Order for Red Cross
For the Fatherless Children of France
Insane Man from Northern Hospital Picked Up Here
Logging Camp Closed
Male Typewriters Badly Needed for Army Service
Marysville's Roll of Honor
Membership of Red Cross Still Gaining
Red Cross Campaign an Assured Success
Uncle Sam to Select Soldiers from These

EXTRACTED EVENTS

Type Names
Event
crime Insane Man from Northern Hospital Picked Up Here
Marshal Powers Monday evening picked up Gust Gertz, an escaped inmate of the Northern Hospital at Sedro-Woolley. The man had wandered down this way and Pat took him in on suspicion, and it was only after much questioning that it appeared certain that he belonged in the Sedro-Woolley institution. Marshal Powers kept him in the cooler overnight and Tuesday morning phoned to Sedro-Woolley and within a few hours three guards were down to take charge of the demented man.
death Wood, Charles Notice: Charles Wood, deceased... Maranda Wood executrix...first publication Jun 22.

Volume XXVI Number 24 Friday, June 29, 1917
Official Paper of Marysville

HEADLINES

Additional Members of the Red Cross Auxiliary
An Appreciation Which is Highly Appreciated
Dangerous Crossing Needs Regulation
Error in Registration of Marysville Young Man
Farm Lands
Marysville Over Subscribes Red Cross--Total $1318.22
Marysville's Roll of Honor
President Wilson Wants 70,000 Men
Sprinkling Notice
Why Not Celebrate the 4th In Everett

EXTRACTED EVENTS

Type Names
Event
Asbery Local and Personal: Mr. Joe Akers of Ottawa, Kansas, aged 92 years, is here on a visit to his daughter, Mrs. Issac Asbery. He is quite spry for his years, having made the trip alone and he thinks our climate just a little cool for June
of interest Local and Personal: One of Marysville's oldest buildings is being wrecked this week by R. D. Lackey. We refer to the large store building on the corner of First and Cedar streets lately occupied by the Murphy Department store. This building was erected by one of our pioneer citizens and Marysville's first Mayor, Mark Swinnerton, (deceased), about thirty years ago. It formerly stood at the west end of First street and was the first large general merchandise store in town.
wooden cop Dangerous Crossing Needs Regulation
The corner of State street and Third, which is the turn in the Pacific Highway and is also Marysville's busiest street crossing, is a very dangerous crossing at the present time because of the speed with which the through traffic turns the corner. Some minor accidents have occurred and some day something very serious will happen if some regulation is not attempted.
The best thing to do would be to put a post in the exact center of the crossing, and on the post a sign directing vehicle drivers to turn to the right. This will require slowing up as to swing around, giving free passage for autos going the opposite direction.
Such signposts are in use in many cities, and with good success. Sedro-Woolley, Mount Vernon and Anacortes have them on several corners, and drivers are getting to know what they mean and to respect them, although the lettering cannot always be seen at a distance.


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