MARYSVILLE GLOBE
The Official Newspaper for
Marysville WA

AUGUST 1913

Volume 22, Number 26, Friday, August 1, 1913 ... $1.00 a Year in Advance

HEADLINES:

Marysville - Past - Present and Future
Help the Editor
Money to Loan
Gibson Reunion
Big Carnival Coming!
Popular concert Wednesday Evening
Good Roads Everywhere
Reingling Circus

EXTRACTED ITEMS

Type Names
Event
born McDonald, baby girl
Local and Personal p Born to Mr. and Mrs. Jas. A. McDonald on Saturday, 19 Jul 1913, an 8 1/2 pound girl.
crimbe - dog
Local and Personal - George Curtiss, G. O. Hawley and F. C.. Bertois each lost valuable dogs last week. These were all valuable animals: the Curtiss and Hawley dogs being Shepherds and the Bertois dog being an Alaska Husky. We understand that parties in the east of town are suspected of the shooting.
history
Marysville - Past - Present and Future
Many of our neighboring towns in speaking of or referring to Marysville, usually say "The Slough Berg" or "Dead Old Marysville" or some equally flattering term.
Time was, when Stimson's and Cobb & Healy had headquarters just above town that Marysville was considered the liveiest berg in this section of Puget Sound. Of course, all this is past and Arlington, way back in the tall timber, has been reaping the rich harvest of these two big logging camps.
However, these two great concerns, will be compelled to leave the vicinity of Arlington some day and we believe the day not far distant, just the same as they were compelled to leave Marysville, and while we wish Arlington and her people no ill luck, we are afraid that things will not look up so well in that thriving berg after this things comes to pass.
Marysville, in the meantime, has gone through a season of depression and slump that only a town with a good location and a bunch of good, patient business men could long endure. But we can see light ahead and it will not be long before Marysville will be one of the livest little cities on the Coast.
Today, we are the second town in the county in the output of shingles, and it is only a matter of a short time until we will be away ahead of any other town in this industry. Our waterfront offers the best locations on the Sound for shingle mills, and millmen all over the Coast are beginning to look this way for mill sites.
Then again, the natural location of the town makes it an ideal place to build; no hills, no grades, no stagnant water to breed malaria. It is an ideal location and when the interurban builds north from Everett next year, you will find that many fine new residences will be built here.
The city council has seen that this is to come about, and as a consequence, several of our streets are being improved by grading, graveling and fine cement sidewals; and while some thing they should have paved the streets, the fact remains that they have made a great permant improvements.
A good town is like a good man, "You Cannot Keep Him Down."
Marysville is also the center of a thriving farming section, and each year adds a number of new homes there formerly was nothing but black stumps.
C. H. Quast, one of our enterprising ranchers on Kellogg Marsh, has even went so far as to build a silo on his farm, which by the way, is the only silo in this part of the country. Mr. Quast informs us that he has already begun to store feed in the same.
Fruit and berries are also extensively cultivated, the Marysville Fruit Growers Association having set out several carloads of vines and trees this spring
All of these things help to make a good town.
move Teager, Gertrude
Local and Personal - Mrs. Gertrude Teager left Tuesday evening by the great Northern route for her old home in Kentucky. She has resided for several years in Marysville, and during that time had won a large number of friends through her genuine sincerity, sweetness of disposition and habitual cheerfulness. Since the death of her husband, Dr. Teager, she has conducted a drug store, and was always a capable and conscientious business woman.

Volume 22, Number 27, Friday, August 8, 1913 ... $1.00 a Year in Advance

HEADLINES:

Springbrook Mill Burns to the Ground
Indian Woman Drowns When Canoe Capsises (sic)
Notice
Getchell Road
Disquieting Possibility
Sunny Side
McMasters Recive Large Tow of Logs
Mrs. Clemons Dies at Hospital
Large Crowds See the Big Carnival
REserved Seats Tuesday
C. E. Bissell

EXTRACTED ITEMS

Type Names
Event
accident
Local and Personal - Two young fellows, who are with the Carnival, engaged in a friendly rough and tumble bout Monday evening, and one of them came near losing an ear. Dr. Thompson was called and sewed the lacerated member back in place.
death Bissell, C. E.
C. E. Bissell Former Publisher of the "Monitor" Dies at Sultan
C. E. Bissell, for nearly ten years editor and publisher of the Monroe Monitor - Transcript before it came into the hands of the present owner, died at Sultan Tuesday of Bright's disease. He has been in a serious condition for some months past, some time ago having turned over his Sultan paper, The Star, to J. A. Swett, and his many friends have been expecting the end. He will be greatly mourned here - the field of his newspaper activities for almost a decade. He had lots of friends and few enemies. He was a good, clean, little fellow who tried to treat the world well and would not do any harm. He might never have made a big success of work as a journalist, but he would always lend his influence to any community where he lived and have the kindly recognition of nearly all who knew him. He has some relatives living and interment will take place away. The remains were taken to Seattle for cremation. (the Monroe Monitor Transcript)
death Clemons, Mrs. Otis
Mrs. Clemons Dies at Hospital
Mrs. Otis Clemons, who has been confined to the Providence Hospital in Everett for the past several weeks died Wednesday at about 1:00 pm. having undergone a second operation just the day previous. She had been in poor health for some time, having suffered from a complication of diseases and general debility, and although slight hopes were entertained for her recovery, she stood the operation very well and seemed to be improving until just a few minutes before she died. She leaves, besides many friends in town, her husband and four young children to mourn her untimely end. The funeral will be held at the Baptist Church, Sunday at 2:00 pm.
death - drowning Walters, Mrs.
Indian Woman Drowns When Canoe Capsises (sic)
When their canoe capsized near Blackman's Point on the Snohomish river Tuesday afternoon, Mrs. Walters, an Indian from Tulalip reservation was drowned and her companion, Mrs. Annie George, also an Indian was rescued from the same fate by a white man named Moe who lives near the scene of the tragedy. The two women were attempting to paddle across the river near where it empties into the bay when the waves which were running quite high, overturned the Indian dugout in which they were riding. An attempt will be made to recover the body of the unfortunate woman this (Wednesday) afternoon at low tide. Coroner Maulsby notified the authorities at Tulalip of the accident and they arrived to take charge of the search for the body. (Everett Morning Tribune.
fire
Springbrook Mill Burns to the Ground
Wednesday morning at about 5 o'clock, the Springbrook Mill, near Getchell Hill, burned to the ground. Although the crew worked desperately the flames made such rapid headway in the dry dust that it was impossible to save anything but the dry kilns. The mill has been operated very successfully for several years by G. H. Russell, and maintained a payroll of $2000.00 per month, when running day and night. The loss is estimated at about $6000.00 with less that $1000.00 insurance. The mill will not be rebuilt, as Mr. Russell had only two months run of timber. Ed. Guerin, the filer, lost $300 worth of tools in the fire.

Volume 22, Number 28, Friday, August 15, 1913 ... $1.00 a Year in Advance

HEADLINES:

Loses Three Fingers While Sawing Shingles
Consolidation of School Districts
Oldest Cat in History of Catdom
Eighth Grade Exams
Sunny Side
Truth Told in a Joke
Obituary - Clemons

EXTRACTED ITEMS

Type Names
Event
accident - mill Nelson, Albert
Loses Three Fingers While Sawing Shingles
Albert Nelson, a sawyer at the "Big Mill", lost the end of three of his fingers last Saturday, while at work at his Sumner Machine. He went to put in a block and stepped on the brake, but it did not work, and the machine went right on. He jerked his arm out and in doing so, his hand came in contact with the clipper saw, with the above result. All things considered, he is very luck, as he stood a good chance to lose an arm. He expects to be back at work in a few weeks.
born Palm, baby girl
Born - Tuesday, 12 Aug 1913 to Mr. and Mrs. Fred Palm, of Kellogg Marsh, a girl.
death Clemons, Stella May
Obituary - Clemons
Stella May Gillmore was born 5 Oct 1883 in Green County MO. In 1901, she was married to Otis Clemons and in 1904 they came West, living in Marysville nearly ever since. She died 6 Aug 1913 in the Providence Hospital, Everett, after an illness of several weeks. She was buried Sunday, Aug 10 from the Baptist Church, Rev. Chandler officiating. Besides her husband, she is survived by four children, namely: William Clarence, Martin Moses, Loren Albert, and Ethel Idella; also, by a father, living in MO: two sisters in KS, and two brothers in MO. for a number of years she has been a member of the Baptist Church, and was highly esteemed and respected. She will be sadly missed, not only by the immediate members of her family, but also by others who knew and loved her.
death Mapes, Fred W.
Notice to Creditors - Fred W. Mapes, Deceased... Stanley P. Mapes administrator.

Volume 22, Number 29, Friday, August 22, 1913 ... $1.00 a Year in Advance

HEADLINES:

Marysville to Have New Water System ?
Obituary - Harding
$5.00
Getchell Road
Samson - Lockwood
No Child Illegitimate
Pomona Grange
Program For Labor Day Celebration
Street Work is Progressing Rapidly
Bank Statement
Baby Drowns in Snohomish River
Obituary - Hall
Gibson Family Reunion Is a Great Success
Rev. Ferguson to Deliver Labor Day Oration Here
High Dive to Be Feature, Labor Day
Archers

EXTRACTED ITEMS

Type Names
Event
annullment Edna C. Sterrit
George C. Sterritt
Summons... Edna C. Sterritt, an infant by Ada M. Dewey, her guardian ad litem Plaintiff vs. George C. Sterritt, Defendant
death Hall, Lawrence
Obituary - Hall
Lawrence Hall was born 1 Oct 1889 and died Aug. 17 last being 14 days to 23 years of age. He was born in Michigan where he lived until he was five years old when the family moved to Missouri. At the age of twenty he came to Washington and has lived in Marysville during the past two years. He is survived by a mother and father and three sisters, two living in Marysville, Mrs. Mabel Shipley and Miss Mary Hall; and one, Mrs. Mina Kiltarien, in Lowell. He became a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church nine years ago and has been a conscientious Christian since that time. The funeral was held Monday afternoon from the Methodist Church, the sermon being delivered by Rev. Ashby. The burial took place in the I.O.O.F. Cemetery and was under the direction of Undertaker Schaefer.
death Harding, Flora
Obituary - Harding
Mrs. Flora Harding, wife of George Harding, died at her home in Birmingham on Friday, 15 Aug 1913 and was buried at the I.O.O.F. Cemetery here on Saturday, the 16th. The Harding family came to Marysville eight years ago from Oklahoma, and lived in this vicinity for a number of years before moving to Birmingham. She leaves a husband and six children to mourn her lost, the eldest child being only 15 years old. Rev. C. D. Erb, of the Nazarene Church, delivered the funeral sermon at the grave, Undertaker C. H. Schaefer having charge of the burial.
death - drowning Stark, Jessie
Baby Drowns in Snohomish River
The body of 16 months old Jessie Stark, who was drowned in the river near the great Northern bridge Monday afternoon, was recovered Tuesday afternoon at low tide. The child's mother, Mrs. Nathaniel Stark, was visiting with a family named Christensen near the bridge when the baby in company with another child its own age wandered outdoors to play. After some time had elapsed they were missed and when search was instituted only one child could be found. Too young to tell of the tragedy that had overtaken its playmate, the searchers could only infer what had happened, and rightly guessed that the little tot had in some way fallen into the river. The child's father was killed sex or eight months ago by accidentally shooting himself. The remains of the drowned child were taken to Maulsby's (Everett Tribune ) Note: Mrs. Stark is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Falkner, of Sunnyside, and has many friends who deeply sympathize with her in her hour of terrible sorrow.
marriage Cook, Grace E.
Johnson, Jacob E.
Local and Personal - Miss Grace E. Cook, of Everett, and Mr. Jacob E. Johnson of Arlington, were married Monday evening at the residence of the officiating minister, Rev. William E. Randall. The ring ceremony was pronounced, Miss Edith E. Lyvers of Marysville and Mr. J. E. Danforth, of Snohomish were the attendants. The new home will be in Arlington (Everett Herald)
marriage Samson, Harold W.
Lockwood, Gladys Elizabeth
Samson - Lockwood
The wedding Harold W. Samson and Gladys Elizabeth Lockwood occurred in Marysville at the home of the brides' mother, Mrs. Catherine Lockwood. August 20th at high noon. Mr. Samson is District Horticulturist and Mrs. Samson has been a member of the H. S. faculty here for the last two years. Both Mr. and Mrs. Samson received their education at the Washington State College, having graduated in the class of 1911. Mrs. Samson is a member of the Sigma Beta Pi Sorority, and Mr. Samson is a member of the Phi Upsilon fraternity. Miss Verne Lockwood, sister of the bride, was the maid-of-honor, and Donald Samson, brother of the groom, acted as best man. The bride was given away by her brother, E. Stanley Lockwood. Rev. Ashby officiated using the impressive right ceremony. The bride's gown was of white crepe meteor and shaw lace, and she carried a shower bouquet of bride's roses and sweet peas. The maid-of-honor was dressed in dainty white and carried a bouquet of pink roses. Green and white foliage and flowers were used to decorate the house in the bride's sorority colors. After the ceremony a dainty buffet luncheon was served. Many useful and beautiful presents were presented to the young couple. The guests were: Mr. and Mrs. F. E. Samson, Donald Samson, of North Yakima; Mr. and Mrs. Truedson, of Puyallup; Mrs. M. F. Randall, of Ellensburg; Mrs. Sergeant and Miss Pluma Thomkins, of Tacoma; Misses Daisy and Cora Uren, Miss Eileen Houlahan, the Misses Rathbun, of Seattle; Miss Eliza Strand, of Clarkston; Misses Stella Wilson and Edna Heater, of Pullman; glenn Powell, Mount Vernon; Mr. Albert Richarson, of Snohomish; Miss Eve Jurgensohn, of Everett; Mrs. Ashby, Mr. and Mrs. Rathvon, Miss Lucile Rathvon and Haldy Rathvon of Marysville. After a short trip Mr. and Mrs. Samson will be at home to their friends at 1311 Wetmore Ave., Everett.

Volume 22, Number 30, Friday, August 29, 1913 ... $1.00 a Year in Advance

HEADLINES:

Health Officer Says City Water is Impure
Tulalip Indians Trim Weyerhausers
Program for Labor Day Celebration
Notice
Ida Powell
District Cerk's Annual Report
School Opens Tuesday, Sept. 2
Team Runs Away and Spills Eggs

EXTRACTED ITEMS

Type Names
Event
accident Sines, C. I.
Getchell Road - C. I. Sines had the misfortune to cut his hand quite badly with an ax, Monday.
accident - horse Hewitt, Robert
Team Runs Away and Spills Eggs
Robert Hewitt, delivery man at the Murphy Bros. Department Store, had a rather exciting time last Saturday afternoon. He had hitched up a young cayuse with one of the old horses, and was returning from the country with four cases of eggs in the wagon. The flies were bad that day and one of the horses kicked over the tongue, and away they went. The line broke and Bob was helpless. The horses ran up the terrace at the Bockwinkel residence and Bob was thrown out but escaped with only a few scratches. Then the team turned the corner at Delta and ran into the second street alley where the wagon turned over and the team stopped. Out of the four cases of eggs, three cases were broken and "Scrambled Eggs in the New Mown Hay" was a reality and not the "Coon" song which we hear on the street. The wagon and horses were uninjured, and Bob thinks he got out of it rather lucky.
letter to the editor - water
Health officer Says City Water is Impure
Several tests of Marysville's drinking water have recently been made by the state board of health with the result of proving conclusively that neither the tap water supplied by the Rucker system nor the more commonly used well-water is safe for drinking purposes. Tests are still being made but enough has been learned to warrant the conclusions above stated. It would seem that between the two preference must be given to the tapwater since the score at present stands - well-water, 100 per cent bad; tap-water, 50 per cent bad. There is small satisfaction in this, however, since it is obvious that any water supply that is even occasionally polluted is unsafe, because it would be impossible to determine and use it only when it is unpolluted.
Let us first considered the question of Marysville's most commonly used drinking water - that obtained by most families from "driven" wells. These wells are of uniform depth all over the town from twelve to fifteen feet, rarely more and often less. The soil penetrated is loose, making the driving of the well so easy that two men can ordinarily push the pipe to the required depth by hand. There is no rock nor protecting "hard-pan" overlying the water level. Under these circumstances it is perfectly safe to state (and the State Board of Health does state) that the water obtained is morely the accumulation of the surface drainage water. Authorities on water supply are unanimous in saying that the surface-water is unfit for drinking purposes for reasons which are too evident to require discussions. Furthermore in Marysville at least, it is no protection to a tell to be located at a high level that the out-house and at a distance from it because in the first place somebody else's out-house is sure to be still higher, and in the second place as long as the soil at the water-level is continuously moist water will flow uphill almost as easily as down. Let anyone who doubts this try the following simple experiment - take two glasses of water one containing a quantity of salt and one pure (tap-water will be sufficient); connect the two by a good size string wet with the pure water, and place the glass of salt water a few inches lower than the other; let them stand and unless the string dries quickly it will not be long before the salt can be readily detected inthe upper glass.
It is highly improbable therefore, on the face of the matter that any of the shallow drinking weels in Marysville are free from sewage contamination, and even though there may be exceptions, the general principals involved make drinking from these wells unsafe. The fact that several generations have drunk from them with immunity for many years is no answer to the arguement whatever. If sewage contamination is probable from the conditions and if actual tests prove it to be present no one will seriously dispute the fact that such water ought to be abandoned at least for drinking purposes. The specimens of well water submitted to the board of health were taken from one of the best wells in one of the best locations in town, and yet each specimen showed the presence of germs which are not natural to the soil but which occur only in the bowel evacuations of man and certain animals. Now as to the tap water. Two specimens of this have been reported on thus far. One showed the presence of the above mentioned bacteria and one did not. If further tests bear out this proportion it would seem that one may drink this water, what there is of it, with a resonalbe gambling chance that he is not imbibind sewate-filth at the same time. Everyone in town however, knows that this water is insufficient in quantity, and that it is at all times so full of dirt and vegetable matter that to drink it at all one must think hard of something else, even if one had great faith in its healthfulness. As a matter of fact, however, to be fit for drinking water should pass not only bacteriological tests but chemical as well, and while this aspect of the matter has not been taken up at this time, tests in the past have shown the Rucker water (at the intake) to be chemically unfit for use because of the decomposing animal or vegetable life or both
Although further tests will be made the work is almost one of supererogation. Both the available sources of water in Marysville are "poor to rotten". A new supply is urgently needed, and until it is obtained the local prohibition forces may as well take a vacation, for when the traditional "water wagon' is suddenly discovered to be a garbage-wagon indisguise many of its passengers, even those in the mourners' seats will undoubtedly abandon it for the beer-keg.
Yours very truly, Robt. N. Tooker, M. D., Health Officer. 3
people Stanhope, Paul
Local and Personal - formerly with the Globe, is now editor of the Wrangell (Alaska) Sentinel. Paul's many friends in Marysville will be pleased to hear of his success in the Far Northwest.
school
School Opens Tuesday, Sept 2
The Public Schools of Marysville will begin work next Tuesday morning with everything in readiness for the pupils. More changes in the teaching corps for the ensuing term have been made than for a number of years, owing chiefly to the fact that Cupid has been more than ordinarily industrious among the teachers, while several have resigned from various other causes. The teaching corps that will attend to the edification of young America for the next nine months will be as follows:
H. J. McMacken, Supt. of Schools; H. S. - C. H. Bowman, Principal; Anna Ullin, Rose Funfsinn, Marion M. Johnson; Domestic Science, Susine Prescott; Manual Training, Maurice Sunstrom.
Grade School: Claude Wright, Principal; Nina Hampen, Bertha Wright, Josie Foster, Maude Pierce, Josephine Foley, Bulah Dale, Cora Densmore.
Shoultes School: Blanche Shannahan and Lucinda Newton
Kellogg Marsh: Mrs. Smathers and Mrs. Ida Scott Tyner.
Mr. Goodman will take care of the hauling of pupils from Jennings' corner, and if the number is too great for one wagon to handle, a second conveyance will run up the Pacific Highway to take care of those pupils living on that road. The School Board has under consideration the hauling of pupils on a gasoline truck and the arrangements made for the presents are only temporary.
Mr. Smathers will haul the pupils on the Kellogg Marsh route commencing at the school house next Tuesday morning. This arrangement, too, in only temporary for if a truck is put on the Shoultes School route the wagon now owned by the district will be put on the Kellogg Marsh route with a possible change in the point of beginning.
the members of the School Board motored out to the Kellogg Marsh School on Wednesday and decided that for the present no pupils living within the two mile limit will be expected to ride on the school wagon which will include all pupils living west of the Arlington road and south of Mr. Langei's place.
All books in the grades below the high school will be furnished by the school district but it has been deemed b est for all concerned that the pupils furnish their tablets and pencils. The wagon will leave about 8 o'clock am and take in the 6th, 7th and 8th grades. The eighth grade will be in the Grade School building instead of the high school as formerly.
school
District Clerk's Annual Record
To County Superintendent of Snohomish County WA for School District No302 for the School Year ending 30 Jun 1913
General Statistics
1. No. of children between 5 and 21 years of age residing in the District 1 May 1913- Male 311; Female, 280; Total 501.
2. No. of different pupils enrolled in public school of District during year - male 235; female 229; Total 464.
Average daily attendance of pupils in public schools - male 198.3; female 176.8; Total 374.1
No. of months public school was taught during year - 9.
5. No. of departments (rooms) maintained during year (s) - 17.
6. No. of different teachers employed in public schools during the year - male 2; female 14; total 16.
7. Average monthly salary paid male teachers during the year - Grade - $95; female $68.33.
8. Average monthly salary paid to male teachers during the year H. S. 80.00
9. No. of pupils over sic years of age not attending school during the year 0 male 71; female 62; total 133.
10. No. of children between the ages of 8 and 15 years not attending school during the year - male 5; female 2; total 7.
11. No. of pupils graduated from the Eighth grade and receiving diplomas --
12. No. of resident pupils attending private schools during year - male -; female 1; total 1.
13. No. of schools built during the year...
14. No. of school house now in district - frame, 3.
Total seating capacity of all school houses in the district,: 450.
16. Estimated value of school houses, including grounds: 22,000.
17. Estimated value of school furniture, apparatus and books: 5,500.
18. Total estimated value of all school property: 27,500. 19. Amount of insurance on school house, furniture, etc...
20. Total number of reference and other books in district library: 2,500.
21. Have teachers kept the registers and made all reports according to law and instruction? Yes.
Name of Teachers- Weeks Employed - Salary a month
C. A. Nelson, 36, --; Dora Campbell, 36, 95.00; Anna Ullin, 36, 80; Rose Funfsinn, 36, 85; Gladys Lockwood, 36, 80; Miss Prescott, 36, 60; C. W. Wright, 36; 95; Mrs. Mitchell Moore, 36, 90; Margaret Bird, 36, 70; Josie Foster, 36, 70; Maude Pierce, 36, 70; Josephine Foley, 36, 70; Cora Densmore, 36, 65; Miss Thompson, 36, 70; Blance Shannahan, , 65; Lucinda Newton, , 65.... (lots of stuff about funding... ) Jeffery Hilton, Clerk of school dist. No. 302
weather Sweeny, G.
Local and Personal - During the electricstorm Friday evening, lightning struck the house of Mr. G. Sweeny, at Kellogg Marsh, tore off a few boards at the base of the house, shattered the screen doors, and skilled a valuable dog. The shock was also felt at C. A. Anderson's.
weather
Local and Personal - The thunder storm last Friday evening was the real thing, and many people on the Sound had never witnessed one like it before. The lightning struck a fence near Mr. Grammar's place north of town, tearing up the posts for considerable distance.


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