MARYSVILLE GLOBE
The Official Newspaper for
Marysville WA

SEPTEMBER 1913

Volume 22, Number 31, Friday, Sept. 5, 1913 ... $1.00 a Year in Advance

HEADLINES:

Views of the People
Back to the States"
Death Claims Another Old Resident
Ah-De-Dah! Ah-De-Dah!
Labor Day Celebration Was a Success
School Opens with Large Attendance
Labor Day Report
Sunny Side

EXTRACTED ITEMS

Type Names
Event
born Stohr, baby girl
Local and Personal - Born - To Mr. and Mrs. Emil Stohr, on Sunday, August 31st, a girl.
born Turner, baby girl
Local and Personal - Born - 1 Sep 1913 to Mr. and Mrs. Homer Turner, at Frazier Mills, BC, a seven-pound girl. A telegram states that both mother and child are doing well.
death Doane, Chas.
Among those from away who attended the funeral of Chas. Doane last Wednesday were Mr. and Mrs. Gallagher and son John, of Seattle, and Mr. and Mrs. Ole Moskeland of this vicinity.
death Saxton, Mary J.
Local and Personal - Mrs. Mary J. Saxton, mother and Mrs. Cassidy, died at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Coulter, in Portland OR, Sept. 1, at the age of 89 yrs 3 mos 12 dys.
death
Charles Doan, one of Marysville's oldest residents, died at his home on Second Street last Saturday morning at 10:00, after an illness of several months, of tuberculosis. Mr. Doan was a respected citizen of this city, and had lived here for many years. He was considered one of the best accountants in the county, and had held many positions of responsibility. As an employee of the Marysville State Bank, he made good; also in the County Treasurer's office for a number of years. He was also deputy assessor at different times. His work was accurate and neat and he was absolutely reliable. Charles Doan was born in Canada, and died in Marysville 30 Aug 1913, at the age of 49 yrs 7 mos 28 dys. He came to the Coast in 1887, locating in Seattle where he conducted a fruit stand for several years. He was married to Miss Jane Anna Storar in Seattle, in 1890 and in 1892 they moved to Marysville, where they have lived ever since. To this union were born five children, namely: John, Moses, Nettie, Edna and Thomas, all of whom survive him, besides his widow and many friends. The funeral services were held in the Congregational church on Wednesday at 2)) pm the Rev. Richard Bushell, of Seattle, preaching the sermon. The remains were laid to rest in the I.O.O.F. Cemetery, under the direction of Undertaker C. H. Schaefer. C. A Lowry Jr., and a number of other county officers from the Court House were in attendance, besides a host of friends from town, to pay their last respects to one who had always been held in high esteem by his fellow-men. The floral decorations were beautiful, and among them one from the entire court house delegation, where Mr. Doan was perhaps the best known.
death
Obituary - Carlson
Charles R. Carlson was born in Orobro, Sweden in 1855 and died in Marysville on 14 Aug 1913 at the age of 58 years. In 1880 he came to America and settled at Sioux Rapids IA, and 1887 was married to Miss Anna Sivertson, of Sioux Rapids. In 1890 he, with his family, moved to Ballard WA and had been a resident of this state ever since. He lived in Everett and Mt. Vernon, and two and a half years ago bought the Dedrick place here in Marysville. He leaves; besides many relatives and friends, his wife and five children, namely: Ella, Arthur, Sivert, Edward and John . The funeral was held at Maulsby's Chapel in Everett August 28 and interment took place in the Evergreen Cemetery in that City. Mr. Carlson was one of our best citizens, honest and industrious and will be sadly missed by his family and friends.
letter to the editor - water
Views of the People
I very much regret the advertising given to Marysville by the letter of your Health Officer in your issue of Aug. 29th. Even if it is true that both the available sources of water in Marysville are "poor to rotten", what advantage is to be gained by sending such news broad-cast over the Country? I know from many years of experience that the water from MOST of the driven wells in Marysville is good and wholesome, as the water is purified by filtering through the sand and gravel. For many years a driven well supplied the school children with good drinking water and the driving of the well was not so easy that "two men could push the pipe to the required depth." I can understand the necessity of a water system to put out any fire that may start, but I do not think it advisable to hurt, or hinder the growth of the best, and most healthy little town in western Washington. Respectfully yours. Richard Bushell

Volume 22, Number 32, Friday, Sept. 12, 1913 ... $1.00 a Year in Advance

HEADLINES:

Views of the People
Obituary - Brady
Card of Thanks
Good Roads Meeting Called for Monday
A Dirty Slam At Marysville
Ebey Mill to be Rebuilt
Sunny Side
George Hartness Passes Away
That Million Dollar Look
Communication
Tulalip Loses at Arlington
For Sale
Prize-Winners of Labor Day
Mail Delivered and Collected on Route No. 1, Sept. 2

EXTRACTED ITEMS

Type Names
Event
accident - child Gellerson, Harold
Local and Personal - Harold Gellerson, the little son of Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Gellerson, had a very painful experience a couple of weeks ago. While playing around a wagon with a couple of companions, he had his toe squeezed nearly off. The tongue of the wagon had been propped up with a stick, and Harold was standing on the tongue, when one of the other boys started to climb up on the end of the same. The prop broke and the tongue came down, catching Harold's toe. The doctors thought to save the toe but it was too badly lacerated and the end had to be cut off. He has suffered considerable pain, but it is thought that part of the member may be saved.
born Allen, baby girl
Born to Mr. and Mrs. Emmett Allen, at Snohomish August 24th, a girl.
death Brady, William
Obituary - Brady
Mr. William Brady died at his home north of Marysville, 8 Sep 1913. He was born in Monroe County OH 4 Jul 1856. He had two brothers and two sisters, three of whom survive him: John Brady, of Athens OH; Mrs. Maggie Hurst of Central Station WV; and Rev. Alexander Brady, of Marysville. On the 26th day of August, 1893 William Brady married to Miss Anna Wood, of Philomath OR. To this union was born four boys: Virgil, Willie, Glen and Francis, all of whom, with the mother, survive him. William Brady with his family moved from Oregon to W. Va., in the fall of 1905, and in Jul 1912 they moved to Washington and have since then resided near Marysville. In early life, Mr. Brady united with the Baptist Church and was still a member of said church at his death. Mr. Brady's last words to his faithful companion were. "I am going home where I shall never suffer more."
death Hartness, George
George Hartness Passes Away
George Hartness, one of the oldest settlers of this vicinity, died at the hospital in Everett on Monday, Sept. 8th after an illness of nearly a year. He had been in poor health a number of years, but was stricken with paralysis last spring and has been helpless ever since. George Hartness was born in Ohio, and came to the Coast when still a young man. He was 79 years at the time of his death. He built the first water power mill for the government at Tulalip many years ago, and served several years as Town Marshal here in Marysville. The funeral sermon was read by Rev. Ashby at the Undertaking Parlors on Thursday afternoon, and interment took place at the I.O.O.F. Cemetery. He leaves no relatives.
letter to the editor - water
Views of the People
It seem to me a curious thing to find a man of evident education and presumable influence criticizing a health officer for performing so obvious a duty as the reporting to the citizens of a town the fact that the State Board of Health has pronounced their drinking water dangerous. As to the "advertising" which the Rev. Bushell regrets so keenly. I am at loss to understand his position. Does he think that the health officer should keep such information secret, or just whisper it about to a few discreet persons like himself? If he agrees that the people concerned are entitled to know such important news as the condemnation of their drinking water by the State, then how, I should like to know, can the news be disseminated except through the public press? It is evident, however, to a discerning eye that this "advertising" is not the real source of Mr. Bushell's iritation with me. He says in his letter that he "knows that the water from MOST of the wells (in Marysville) is good and wholesome". Ah there's the rub! He doesn't believe or does not want to believe the report of the Board of Health. Or perhaps he merely doesn't believe me when I say that I have had these had reports on the water. One is tempted to ask Mr. Bushell why, since he is now living in Seattle where the water is excellent and is tested at regular intervals to keep it so, he should considered himself called upon to encourage the people of Marysville in drinking water that is even under suspicion. Also since the Rev. Bushell, however learned in matters of Theology, is not generally credited with any profound knowledge of medical subjects, it is perfectly fair to point out to him that it seems a trifle presumptuous for him to contradict the health authorities on the wholesomeness of drinking water. When he says that he "knows the water from MOST of the wells etc." he is guilty of gross exaggeration. He knows nothing of the kind. n He does not even know that the well water has not caused sickness during the years that he saw so many children and others drinking it with apparent impunity. There has certainly been some sickness in Marysville and it is not for him to say that some of it has not been caused by the water. If he had been more cautious in his statements and simply said for instance that in the past the water could hardly have been very bad because the people drinking it have maintained a high average of health, one would have to admit the force of the argument, although it is weak at best, since past harmlessness is no guarantee of its good character in the present or future. In one respect, however, I am compelled to admit that Mr. Bushell's criticism of my letter is well taken. He takes exception to my statement that Marysville's water is "poor to rotten." It may be the slang that he finds offensive; but from the drift of his letter I think it more the meaning. I housld have confined myself to the statement that the water was "unsafe". "poor" and "rotten" are at best only relative terms for which there is no standard. What one man consideres grand will turn the stomach of another. According to the Board of Health Marysville's drinking water is being contaminated with sewage. I do not insist that this renders it "poor to rotten", Mr. Bushell may like it. But without any room for differences of taste of opinion, it is dangerous. It seems necessary to explain to Mr. Bushell, with reference to the people drinking this water without harm in the past, that a thing may be dangerous and yet never do any harm. A load of dynamite under the kitchen stove would be considered by most people undesirable and dangerous, and yet it might stay there for generations without exploding. One can imagine even that the family might get so accustomed to seeing it there they would never give a thought to its dangerousness, and grown quite attached to it - even to the point of snarling at a stranger who showed alarm over it. I suppose that if some miner or someone else familiar with the use and abuse of dynamite should happen along and critcize the habit of keeping dynamite under the stove. Rev. Bushell would promptly bob up with a letter stating that he knew about many years' experience that dynamite under the kitchen stove was very ornamental and pleasant and it made children healthy and vigorous. Robt. N. Tooker, M. D. Health Officer. 9/12/1913
Marysville
A Dirty Slam at Marysville
"If you go the right road you will strike bum roads at Marysville. There is a way to go around this God-for-saken hole if you can find it. The chances are that you will strike the town, however, before you know it. We did. In going through the town you will find that the rubes who run it have dug gullies at every street intersection. The are so deep that it is necessary to almost come to a full stop at each of them. There ought to be a state law to prevent such vandalism. The guide book says to turn north at the railroad track. The road has been changed, however. Turn north two or three blocks before reaching the railroad. It is best to inquire. God gave you your tongue to ask questions with, and if you ask a child you may get some information. The grown-ups just stare at you, and it seems to take about twenty minutes for the gist of your question to sink in. For a few miles above Marysville the roads are just about what you would expect. It is a good place to break springs. Above that point the road is fine for many miles." The above is taken from an article in the Seattle "Argus" of Sep. t, entitled: "What the Stoller See and Hears" on an auto trip from Seattle to Vancouver, B. C.
the write must have been drunk or asleep, or he would have seen that the streets thru town were being improved. There is also a large Pacific Highway sign at the turn north on State street and anyone with ordinary intelligence would find it hard to get on the wrong road.
move Bowman, Hazel and Anna
Local and Personal - The Misses Anna and Hazel Bowman expect to leave Saturday for Idaho. Their places in the telephone office will be taken by the Misses Hanson, of Bothell.

Volume 22, Number 33, Friday, Sept. 19, 1913 ... $1.00 a Year in Advance

HEADLINES:

Views of the People
With the Mills
Marysville Good Roads Club Organized
Celebrate Golden Wedding
Pont-Sauntry Mill is Sold
Oat Crop is LIght this Year
Three Big Bargains in Bottom Farms
Harvest Ball
New Books
Attends Convention
Improved Long Distance Service for Marysville

EXTRACTED ITEMS

Type Names
Event
accident - mill Hodge, Don
Local and Personal - Don Hodge had the misfortune to cut off the tip of the second finger of his left hand, while sawing at the Big Mill, Tuesday. He had taken Tom Baker's place for a few minutes at one of the uprights when the accident occurred.
anniversary Marquette, Mr. and Mrs.
Celebrate Golden Wedding
Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Marquette entertained a few of their immediate neighbors and friends at their beautiful home on State Street, last Saturday, in honor of the fiftieth anniversary of their marriage. At six o'clock dinner was served and all did ample justice to the bounteous repast. During the evening the guests were entertained with music and pleasant conversation. Mr. and Mrs. Marquette were the recipients of many pretty and useful presents. However, the one worthy of special note is that of a beautiful signet ring, presented by Mr. Marquette to his bride a fifty years ago. The guests departed at a late hour wishing the host and hostess many more years of happy wedded life. those present were Mr. and Mrs. Bedford, Mr. and Mrs. Dages, Mr. and Mrs. Hatton, Mrs. E. M. Miller, Mr. and Mrs. F. Plont, Mr. and Mrs. Shira and sons, Leo and Roma and Mr. and Mrs. Vincint.
death W. Read
Local and Personal - Word has been received that Mars. Metcalf's father, W. ?. Read, died at his home at Hay Springs NE, 11 Sep 1913
letter to the editor - water
Poor Old Marysville
Poor old Marysville gets it in the neck again. First: our health officer says our drinking water is "rotten", and then comes a "guy" from Seattle and tells us that the "the rubes who run our town" have dug it so full of holes that when he is out joy-riding that he has to come to a full stop at each hole, and intimates that he will see that the next legistlature enacts a law preventing such "vandalism."
The doctor does not tell us where he secured the "rotten" water which he analyzed, nor that he intends to "carry it the Legislature". The Seattle guy does not tell us where he secured the "booze" which crossed his wires, whether he was a Seattle brand, or whether he got it from the lower end of Maes' drain pipe; in either case, everybody knows that our lives in Marysville are in great danger; and knowing this fact, no one should delay another day in having that Joint' Deed made out. We have executed many of these deeds, but many are putting it on from day to day and when the grim reaper gets you, it will be too late; and your wife will have to go into Court to settle the estate; and when she gets through, when will forget YOU quicker than she will her experience with lawyers an courts. This Joint Deed is in conformity with Statute Laws and covers both real and personal property and gives the survivor the right to dispose of property as he or she pleases without the aid of Courts.
Marysville
(see this for Black Gang)
Notice - Notice of levy and estimate of public expense for ensuing year to be raised by taxation. Town of Marysville WA
Estimate of Expense: Marshal- 900.00; Clerk- 180.00; Attorney- 300.00; Police Judge- 60.00; Health Officer- 24.00; Lights- 1140.00; Water- 498.00; Labor- 200.00; Lumber- 200.00; Fire Department- 50.00; Election of Officers- 30.00; Printing- 50.00; Supplies- 150.00; Teaming- 125.00; Wood- 10.00; Street Improvements- 1000.00; Telephone- 20.00; Redemption G. F. Warrants- 1000.00; Public Library- 120.00; Continent Expense Fund- 683.00. Total $6640.00
Estimate of Income Other than Direct Taxation: Saloon License- 3600.00; Theater and other Licenses- 100.00 Dog Tax- 60.00; Fine Police Judge- 100.00; Taxes- 2780.00 Total $6400.00 .... Witnessed C. M. Schumacher, Town Clerk.

Volume 22, Number 34, Friday, Sept. 26, 1913 ... $1.00 a Year in Advance

HEADLINES:

Views of the People
A Song of Tulalip
Mary Had a Little Calf
Subscribers Guilty of Felony
Work Will Soon Begin on Road
More Snakes
Celebrate Golden Wedding
Three Big Bargains in Bottom Farms
Casimir Sam Found Not Guilty
Marysville Loses Opening Football Game

EXTRACTED ITEMS

Type Names
Event
accident - mill Anderson, Russell
Local and Personal - Russell Anderson had his fingers badly lacerated when they were caught in the gearing of the single block at the "Big Mill" last Monday. He will be laid up for some time.
accident - mill Nutter, Levi
Local and Personal - Levi Nutter lost two fingers while working in a mill in Everett on Monday of this week.
anniversary Christensen, Mr. and Mrs. O.
Celebrate Golden Wedding
Mr. and Mrs. O. Christensen entertained a few friends at their home on Fifth and Beech, last Tuesday evening, in honor of the fiftieth anniversary of their marriage. The guests were entertained with music and beautiful songs by Mr. H. Helgesen and son, C. M. Helgesen, a young theatrical men from Seattle, who also kept the guests in merry laughter relating his experience on the stage; after which a light luncheon was served, including the golden wedding cake. Those present were: Mesdames C. Thompson, Matson, Mary Knudson, Emma Taylor, C. Limpright; Messrs. C. Thompson, C. Limpright, H. Helgesen, C. Helgesen, A. Christensen; also Lilah Christensen, Clifford Limpright, Martin Malcolm Taylor, and the host and hostess.
born Buttke, baby boy
Local and Personal - Born to Mr. and Mrs. Arthur C. Buttke, Thursday morning, 25 Sep 1913, a boy.
born Sines, baby boy
Local and Personal - Born To Mr. and Mrs. C. I. Sines, a baby boy.
death Backman, Charles
Notice to Creditor: Charles Backman, alias Charles Beckman, deceased.... Knute Neste, Administrator.
death
Local and Personal - Mrs. D. Richardson was called to Everett, Monday. Her mother, Mrs. Pritchard, died at a hospital there. She was buried Tuesday
indian
Views of the People
(Note: the following letter by Dr. Buchanan, Supt. of the Tulalip Indian Agency, is a duplicate of one written in defense of Casimir Sam, who was recently arrested on the charge of shooting ducks on the Reservation.)
(from) Tulalip Indian Agency, 22 Sep 1913.(to) Game Warden Snohomish County Everett Washington, Sir:
One of your deputies has arrested one of my Indians, Casimir Sam, for shooting ducks for food off the mouth of the Snohomish River, in spite of the fact that this Indian has treaty rights and he was seeking his natural provender in his natural way without seeking food at the county almhouse or that bounty which the Government does NOT supply (in the way of rations) TO THESE INDIANS. I wish to protest against the action of your officer in making a good law ridiculous and in pushing it to impossible extremes. Furthermore, your officer came upon the reservation, at Priest Point, without a passport, removing the ducks. Section 2131 of the Revised Statutes of the United States (supported by other sections) provides for a fine of 41,000 for this offense of your office. Shall we not profit by your thoughtless example and push our Federal Statutes against you $1,000 worth? You yourself have committed a greater offense than you can charge against this industrious Indian in search of his dinner. Would you have our Indians paupers or thieves?
Respectfully, Charles M. Buchanan, Superintendent, etc.
indian
Casimir Sam Found Not Guilty
Tuesday, Sept. 23, Casimir Sam was found not guilty of crime by the jury. Much interest was displayed throughout the trial and the courtroom of Judge Sheller was filled with, Indians. Their intense interest was due to the fact that the Indians wished to know just where they stand in regard to hunting game in this county. There were disappointed in the verdict because had Sam been found guilty they would have appealed and carried the case to a high court. As it now stands, an acquittal in justice court leaves the matter just as it was before. The Indians maintained that the treaty of Mukilteo, signed years ago, when there were but a few white men in this country, gave them the right to fish and hunt and notwithstanding the state game laws they still have their treat rights in regard to hunting and fishing. The law has been interpreted to mean that the Indian can hunt and fish when and wherever he likes so long as he stays on the reservation, but as soon as he crosses the reservation line he is subject to the same treatment as the white man and cannot kill game out of season.
move Kester, C.
Local and Personal - C. Kester has moved his family from Edgecomb to Mr. Vernon where the children will attend Forest Home Academy.
wildlife - snake Whitmore, Dan
More Snakes
Dan Whitmore captured another large snake one day this week and has him on exhibition at the "Maes". This one is similar in size to the one which Vernon Murphy shot a short time ago.
A rattler was shot last week in Stanwood by a boy who heard him rattling under his wood shed. At this rate the Carnival Company will soon be minus their snake show.


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These pages were extracted and placed on line by Darilee Bednar
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