MARYSVILLE GLOBE
The Official Newspaper for
Marysville WA

August 1917

.... because of the gearing up for WWI there seems to be very little 'birthin' or 'dyin' although the paper continues to be the same size.

Volume XXVI Number 29 Friday, August 3, 1917
Official Paper of Marysville

HEADLINES
to be added later

EXTRACTED EVENTS

Type Names
Event
accident auto SEATTLE BOY KILLED ON PACIFIC HIGHWAY
A collision of Ford cars occurred on the Marysville-Everett road, near the Arlington cutoff last Thursday evening, resulting in the death of Howard Durkee, a Seattle boy, and the injury of other occupants of the car. A coroner's inquest held the next day rendered a verdict that:
"The death of Howard I. Durkee was caused by being crushed under the front seat of an automobile which was accidentally overturned on the Pacific highway south of Marysville and we further exonerate all parties from blame.
A conflicting story of the accident was told at the inquest. Harry Charles and Roy Dudley told of their camping trip, and said they were coming slowly along the Marysville road south of Marysville between 12 and 15 miles an hour, when the Ford couple driven by Sommerville passed them, and turned in too quickly, the rear right wheel of the Sommerville car striking the front left wheel of the other machine throwing the wheels at right angles so that the car turned turtle into the ditch. The boys testified that Sommerville had plenty of room to pass, but turned in ahead too soon.
Sommerville told the coroner's jury that he didn't think his car had struck the other machine but that he felt a slight jar and thought he had gone off the pavement in passing the car. He said he had passed the boys once before north of Marysville and had had difficulty in getting clearance, as the other car was zig-zagging across the road, so that he was very careful in passing it again. He said that he stopped at a Marysville garage, so that the boys passed him, but that he caught up with them again when the accident occurred. He said the other car, he thought was three or four feet from the side of the pavement.
death Celestine, Bob Religious fanaticism was responsible for the murder of an aged Indian on the Tulalip reservation Sunday afternoon. Some of the Indians have adopted a belief which gives them the name "Shakers," and they evidently are rightly named, for they work themselves into a frenzy with swaying, chanting, shouting, attempting to fly, and various orgies which are nothing less than insanity.

Three half-breeds, George Jones, Rosa Weild and Lena Jefferson, living two or three miles west of Marysville on the main road were undergoing their religious ceremonies, and believed they had a command from God to kill Bob Celestine, an Indian sixty years old and a cripple.

After going through prayers and incantations they began on Celestine by throwing water on him from a bucket, and Jones jammed the bucket over his head and bore him down and held him flat on his back while the two women got boards and beat him about the body until dead. Jim Jefferson, Lena's husband, was present and took no part in the beating, although doing nothing to prevent the tragedy.

After they were sure the old man was dead the Indians piled sand on him and laid sticks across his body in the form of a cross and went to the beach where they carried on further ceremonies, keeping three children with them there and in the woods all night.

The body was discovered by Mary Jones, mother of George, when she returned from berry-picking along in the evening. She sent word into Marysville and Undertaker Schaefer went out together with Robert Sheldon, one of the Indian police. It was not till after Mr. Schaefer examined the body that it was known that the man had met death by violence.

Mr. Schaefer notified Coroner Maulsby about midnight and in the morning Marshal Powers with Mr. Schaefer went out and brought in the three Indians with the three children. They were less than a mile west of the Ebey tracks, and they were safely in jail by 10:30.

Coroner Maulsby called a jury and held an inquest at 1 o'clock p.m. The facts as stated ere admitted by the Indians involved with no hesitation, and one little girl about nine years old told a straightforward story of how it happened. The jury was composed of Steve Saunders, I. Asbery, R. D. Lasky, Milford Carr, Fred McCann and W. Tallman. After taking a look at the remains and looking in on the prisoners who were still keeping up their dancing, moaning, praying and swaying, the jury formed a verdict in accordance with the facts as stated, and the three were taken to the county jail, together with Jim Jefferson. The murdered man, Bob Celestine, served a short term in the penitentiary for killing a man about eight years ago, although he has been quite peaceful since. George Jones is a college graduate and the two women and Jim Jefferson have been through the Tulalip schools, and all were citizens and not under the jurisdiction of the agency.

death Johnson, Harold LeRoy, Harold LeRoy, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Ole Johnson, was born July 4th and died on the 25th inst., aged 21 days. the bereaved parents have the sympathy of their many friends and neighbors.
death Swinnerton, George Body of Geo. Swinnerton Found Near Mission Head
The body of George Swinnerton 11-year-old boy who was drowned near Priest Point on the 20th inst. was found near the Mission on Friday the 25th by the family of Alex Brady while on an outing. The funeral was held at the residence of the boy's uncle, Steve Saunders, Saturday at 2 p.m., Rev. R. A. Cunningham officiating. Interment was made in the I.O.O.F. cemetery, beside his father and mother.
The unfortunate boy made his home with his grandmother, Mrs. Geo. Fuller in Everett, and left besides his aunt, Mrs. Steve Sanders, three other aunts, Mrs. Robert Geddes, and the Misses Georgia and Muriel Swinnerton, all of Marysville.
reunion Gilkey Five Generations Form a Unique Group Picture
Mr. F. E. Gilkey, a rancher living near Marysville, has the distinction of being the head of a family of five generations. They were together at his home one day last week and have a group picture taken at the studio of M. H. Carpenter. The family consists of great-great grandfather, F. E. Gilkey, great-grandmother, Mrs. Ida Conn, grandmother, Mrs. Anna Kerr, mother, Mrs. Agnes Ezra, and three month's old son, all of Edison except the head of the family.
wooden cop Marysville's wooden policeman at the corner of State and Third streets, backed up by a real live traffic cop, is doing efficient duty since Tuesday evening, the traveling public seeming to catch on and turn to the right by instinct when they see the sign in the middle of the road. In only a few cases was it necessary for Marshal Powers to stop motorists and make them back up and go around. At present there is no ordinance by which fines could be assessed, but one is being prepared for presentation at the meeting of the town council next Monday evening. In the meantime Pat's orders go, all the same.

Volume XXVI Number 30 Friday, August 10, 1917
Official Paper of Marysville

HEADLINES
to be added later

EXTRACTED EVENTS

Type Names
Event
accident railroad THROUGH FREIGHT TRAIN AND "OWL" HAVE COLLISON (sic)
A head-on collison (sic)occurred near English station four miles north of town at 6 o'clock Sunday morning, the southbound "Owl" passenger train running into the northbound through freight, which was standing on the main track a few rods below the station. No one was killed, and only one engineer hurt, not seriously. Traffic was held up about four hours. A number of freight cars went off the track, one of which was badly crushed, its frailty probably preventing many others from going off.
The cause was uncertain. The statement was made by some that the "owl" had received orders at the last station to stop at English and wait 20 minutes for the through freight. The freight was already at English when the "Owl" pulled in, and in the fog the engineer did not see it until too late. He was nearly to a standstill, which explains why no one was hurt and why no more damage was done.
death Steinbrecher, Arthur Local and Personal
Rev. C. D. Erb and family went to attend the funeral service of Mrs. Erb's only full brother, Mr. Arthur Steinbrecher, who died Sunday evening at the hospital in Seattle, after an operation for appendicitis. He leaves a wife and a child and other relatives, and a host of friends (for he was much loved and honored,) to mourn his untimely and sudden departure to their great grief and loss.
of interest Celestine, Bob RESERVATION INDIANS MEET AND RENOUNCE SHAKERISM
The Globe has received from Dr. C. M. Buchanan, superintendent in charge of the Tulalip Indian reservation, a clear statement of the affairs leading up to the murder of Bob Celestine on July 29th, and a statement of the action taken by the Indians in a four-hour session called the following Wednesday to consider the danger to the community of the practice of the so-called Shaker religion. This speaks for itself, and we publish it in full here with.
To Our Shaker Friends:
About 5:00 P.M. Sunday evening, July 29th, 1917. Bob Celestine, an adherent of Shakerism on the Tulalip Reservation, was killed just outside the home of Mr. and Mrs. Al and Mary Jones, Tulalip Reservation, not far from Marysville. Mr. Jones is a white man and his wife is an Indian of the full blood and her home is built on the allotment of her deceased father Robert Snit-salh or Tzeet-tzahtlh on the banks of Ebey Slough between Priest Point and Marysville. The murderers were George Jones and his two married sisters Mrs. Lena Jefferson and Mrs. Rose Weil, all three of them being the adult children of Mr. and Mrs. Al and Mary Jones referred to above. Mrs. Weil's husband (a white man, a mechanical engineer by trade) is himself demented and has been confined in the state asylum at Sedro-Woolley for a year or more.
The Jones' home has been for years a stronghold of Shakerism with all of its vagaries and its foolish insincere pretences to being a Christian religion or even any religion at all, in any proper sense of the word. In fact Bob Celestine was on the Jones place at the time of his death attending Shaker meetings. For some years George Jones has been a scoffer at Shakerism but became a convert to the craze a couple of weeks ago--speedily followed by his losing his mind, which is not an infrequent occurrence in Shaker communities. The continual atmosphere of alleged religious frenzy, exaltation, dancing, shaking, shouting, quivering, jumping, preaching, yelling, bell ringing, the bedlam of stamping feet, shreiking voices, etc., brought on a profound condition of mental and bodily exhaustion and weakness and a continuation of the practices brought on the inevitable consequence, namely, not only the loss of mental and bodily control but also the actual loss of intelligent and rational mental control. These things incessantly done are not only vicious and harmful but they are more than human flesh can endure. The inevitable was invited and the inevitable came -- these three frenzied and fanatical Shakers became howling lun- (sic) and murdered their co-religionist, Bob Celestine, a man innocent of any harm to them, a fellow believer but one who happened along at the wrong time for safety.
George Jones was a young man of strong body and strong mind, a handsome young man of unusually fine physique-- a well-known athlete and ball-player. He has a wide circle of friends and acquaintances. He was moderately well educated and had traversed the country several times; therefore his whole life had not been centered in one little line or community or in one groove, he was, to a certain extent, cosmopolitan so far as Puget Sound Indians go. He attended the present Government school at Tulalip (which neither Rose nor Lena nor her husband ever attended) he also attended the Government school at Chemawa and the one at Haskell. He had also been a student at Hampton Institute, Va. Thus his schooling had been gotten in Washington, Oregon, Kansas and Virginia to that extent he was a cosmopolitan. He had a vigorous, well-balanced body and a strong well-balanced mind, a sound mind in a strong body. If the vicious practices and foolish frenzies of that travesty on religion called Shakerism could overwhelm such a physique and unbalance such a mind as that of George Jones, if can do and will do the same for you, and you, and me for all of us. It has then the possibility of making of Tulalip Reservation, or any other reservation, or community, a veritable asylum of howling, jumping, dancing, irresponsible lunatics! It has done so and it can continue to do so! In the face of such a possiblity and its contination, no person or thing would be really safe. The realization of these things has deelply stirred the intelligent and progressive portion of the population at Tulalip and this element requested the superintendent to call a mass meeting of the people of the reservation in order that a joint and general resolution be passed that the pernicious practices be prohibited--several demands were made that the Government put it down with a strong hand. It was suggested, however, that, in such a case, we could hardly consistently call on the Government to do what we had not done ourselves or had not taken the steps to do. Our intelligent Indian population, with singular force and unammity, declare that many of their good and godly white friends, now and in the past, have been completely fooled by the pretence of Shakerism to be a religion, much less a Christian religion. It is paganism, pure and simple, with all of its backward vision and aspirations, but masquerading on the surface as something which it is not at heart. It is the old tamanamus practice prohibited by the regulations but glossed over with an appearance of white man's religion in order to catch the sympathy of the white man and completely fool him on the side of his boasted religious liberty. It has nothing whatsoever to do with God in spite of claims and pretences to the contrary. Its official stationery bears the legend: "We worship according to the rites of our fathers." Their fathers were neither Christians nor Shakers their fathers were out and out pagans practicing the rites of the old, dangerous and prohibited tamanamus.
A claim has been made that the three murderers were not Shakers but that is ridiculous and untrue. They were Shakers and from that became lunatics. There (sic) mother is a Shaker. Their brother "Bill" Jones is a Shaker and a strong out-and-out Shaker Sympathizer and partisan. The Jones home has been the strongest stronghold of Shakerism on the reservation--containing three generations of Shakers. George and his two unfortunate sisters are now lunatics and have been committed to the state hospital for the insane at Sedro-Woolley, this state. May peace and rest come to their broken minds and bodies!
A mass meeting of the Indians of Tulalip Reservation was held, as requested, at Tulalip Agency, at 2:00 o'clock on the afternoon of August 1st, 1917, while the body of Bob Celestine lay yet unburied. The meeting developed an indignant, strong, impassioned and overwhelming opposition to the dangerous and pernicious practieces of Shakerism--one speaker told us how his life has been threatened if he refused to join the "religion" and thus hold it in contempt. Our Shaker friends, whose presence had been particularly invited, seemed to thoroughly realize the ghastliness of what had occurred and that the strength of public sentiment, both white and Indian, in all the country roundabout, was firmly set against any further foolishness of the kind. Our Shaker friends voluntairly offered to forego their future meetings and to refrain from dancing, shaking and all similiar dangerous and exciting practices. The meeting was a four hour session of ringing and impassioned oratory but broke up with universal good feeling all around. We have resolved to walk down the same road together, heart to heart and hand in hand, friends in word and friends in deed! Klosh kawkwah! Tlohb asiatah!

Volume XXVI Number 31 Friday, August 17, 1917
Official Paper of Marysville

HEADLINES
to be added later

EXTRACTED EVENTS

Type Names
Event
crime robbery RANCHER HAS RIBS BROKEN BY BURGLAR
O. L. Peterson, one of our nearby ranchers and milk vender, suffered from two or three broken ribs and was nearly knocked out last Thursday night at about 10 o'clock by a thief who was stealing grain from his barn. Mr. Peterson had missed grain but was not at this time suspecting the presence of any marauder when he went to the barn on coming home from down town and went out to attend to some chare.
The first he knew a feed box struck him in the stomach and took his breath, breaking some ribs. A moment later as he was attempting to rise the theif kicked him in the stomach and this time he lost consciousness, and when he came to, the man had gone. Mr. Peterson was able to barely drag himself to town to see a doctor and to make complaint. It was too dark to see his assailant, but he thinks he knows who it is.
lumber i.w.w. True Condition of the Lumber Industry
The demand for arbitration in the lumber strike did not bring any results because there was nothing really to arbitrate. It would be just as fair to compel one railroad to grant an 8 hour day when competitive railroads were operating on a 10-hour day as it would to ask the lumber industry of the state of Washington to operate on an 8-hour day when their competitors Southern Pine, British Columbia and Northern Hemlock are operating on a 10-hour day.
It is claimed that the lumber strike is nothing more nor less than an I.W.W. agitation.
The lumbermen are not opposed to an 8-hour day if this is made National, but they claim that to operate on an 8-hour day in competition with a 10-hour day would mean bankruptcy.
The investigation brought out the astonishing fact that there are only 913 mills in the Pacific Northwest, as against 48,108 mills in other sections. The report also brought out the Government figures, that the lumber industry is not a prosperous one, which report states that on January 24th, 1917, 40 per cent of the mills which were operating in 1913 are now bankrupt, or have been liquidated by the courts.
The investigation further brought out the fact that wages have been raised three times voluntarily by the employers since January of this year, and that Washington mill operators are today paying the highest wages in the lumber industry of this or any other country.
The manufacturers asked labor to compromise by going back to work until January 1st on the present 10-hour schedule, so that they could fill the contracts which were priced on the 10-hour day. This labor refused to do but made counter proposals asking for an 8-hour day at 8-hour pay.
The lumbermen would not consent to this because they were satisfied that the majority of labor wanted to work the full 10 hours and get paid for it. They did not want a curtailment of their earnings as this would bring about.
wooden cop Wednesday afternoon Marysville suffered the loss of one of her policemen. He was knocked down by Clair Robinson's truck, losing an arm and having both feet badly crushed. Some are saying that we lost the wrong policemen. The one who stuck to his post night and day and never said a word was sacrificed while the one who talks and is a constant bill of expense to the city was unharmed. A couple of days in the hospital and the wooden policeman resumed his duties.

Volume XXVI Number 32 Friday, August 24, 1917
Official Paper of Marysville

HEADLINES
to be added later

EXTRACTED EVENTS

missing paper

Volume XXVI Number 33 Friday, August 31, 1917
Official Paper of Marysville

HEADLINES
to be added later

EXTRACTED EVENTS

Type Names
Event
death Marshall, Donald J. After a long lingering illness, little Donald J., youngest son of Frank L. and Orville Marshall quietly breathed his young life away at the home of his parents on 4th street at 11 o'clock on the night of August 16th. Donald was 7 years, 7 months and 16 days old. A patient sufferer for many months; an uncomplaining loving child. The parents have the consolation of knowing that their loss is their boy's great gain, and though he can not come to them, they can go to him. Donald was born in Pilchuck Wash., and with his parents came to Marysville last fall, his father becoming a stockholder in the Royal Cedar Company. They desire to thank the many friends and neighbors for kindnesses shown them during their son's sickness and death.
lumber i.w.w. Commentary: A BAD PRECEDENT
Critcisms of President Wilson ... very few....
But... there are some results of his pre-election acts that are bearing fruit. One of a very serious nature is the way he handled the railway brotherhoods strike situation at about this time last year. In forcing the passage of the Adamson eight-hour law he set a precedent which is having far-reaching consequences. Now when a union of lumber workers, ship carpenters or any other class of working men strike for eight hours they feel pretty sure they can get it by holding out until the state or national authorities get busy, for they will order the operators to allow the eight hour day and go ahead. Governor Lister seems to be following this idea, and the new National Labor Council which is coming to investigate strikes and disputes is looked forward to by the laboring men as pretty sure to give them the eight hour day.
The eight hour day may be all right for some, but the man in this day who is getting ahead during his active life is working ten hours and often much more.
marriage Williams, Gus N. Mr. Gus N. Williams, formerly Principal of Marysville schools, was married to Miss Murie Olive Wildman August 21, at Elwood, Neb. Mr. Williams is now at Presidio, California in the second officers' training camp. He is one of 88 men selected for officer training from Utah.
school Teachers for Marysville Schools for Coming Year
Marysville schools will open next Tuesday with a full corps of teachers. Following is a complete list. H. J. McMacken, Superintendent
High School
J. H. Hallock, Principal
Anna Ullin, Languages
Lottie Oglivie, English
Edith Sifton, Science and Math
Mildred Stacy, Commercial
Elsie Smith, Dom. Science
L. B. Travers, Manual Training
Seventh Street School
Mattie Ellis, Princ. 8th Grade and Supt. of Music
Marcia Smith, Seventh Grade
Pearl Earles, B Sixth Grade
Frink, B Fifth Grade
Josephine Foley, Third Grade
Cora Denamore, Second Grade
Anneta Nelson, First and Second Grade
Bulah Dale, First Grade
Tenth Street School
Olive Temple, Prin. A Sixth Grade
Anne Pratt, A Fifth Grade
Doris Anderson, A. & B Fourth Grade
Shoultes School
Faye Warren, Prin. 7th and 8th Grades
Effie Johnson, 4th, 5th and 6th Grades
Isabella Cuthbertson, 1st, 2nd, and 3d Grades
Kellogg Marsh School
Ethel Campbell, Prin. 4th, 5th and 6th Grades
Mrs. Luella Scott Nelson, 1st, 2nd, and 3d Grades
wooden cop Woman Tourist Learns It Wont Do to Lose Temper
Fines and still more fines are being collected from offending motorists who ignore the wooden policeman. Last Sunday a car with three occupants driven by a land, passed to the left and Marshall Powers stopped them as usual. The lady was properly (?)(sic)indignant, and told our worthy marshal that it was just like a big stiff of his caliber to hold up people for a petty offense. She soon regretted her remarks when Pat took her before Judge Gilmer who suggested a fine of $10.00. She began to apologise profusely saying there wasn't so much money in the party. She begged so hard and apologized so nicely that Pat relented and the judge lowered the fine to the minimum of $3.00.


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