MARYSVILLE GLOBE
The Official Newspaper for
Marysville WA

January 1917

Volume XXV Number 51 Friday, January 5, 1917
Official Paper of Marysville

HEADLINES

Christmas Entertainment
Decrease of Inmates in County Poor Farm
Deer Hunting in Montana
Grand Reception for Newly Wedded Couple
Life in Roumania (sic)
Marlo the Magician Monday Evening
Mild Form of Measles Still Prevails in City
Small Burglary at High School Building
The Cave Man: A Story of Evolution of Character
Two Weeks Course in Gas Engines and Tractors

EXTRACTED EVENTS

Type Names
Event
birth Hawley, girl Local and Personal: Born to Mr. and Mrs. Floyden Hawley, Dec. 30, a nine-pound girl.
birth Hodges, girl Local and Personal: Born to Mr. and Mrs. Don Hodges on Friday last, an eight pound girl.
birth Witscher, son Kellogg Marsh: An 8-lb. boy came to gladden the home of Mr. and Mrs. Chas Witscher on New Years day.
crime robbery   SMALL BURGLARY AT HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING
Some time Tuesday night some one entered the High School building through the basement window and secured access to Supt. McMackin's office room by cutting a hole through the door large enough to insert a hand and unlock the door from the inside. They ransacked the drawers and secured money to the extent of about $10. belong to various funds.
There is no clue so far to the perpetrators but it seems clear that it must have been some student or attache of the school who knew money was kept about and who knew the lay of the land.
disease measles   MILD FORM OF MEASLES STILL PREVAILS IN CITY
    The epidemic of measles while of a mild form, is not being stamped out as promptly and satisfactorily as may be desired. In fact, Dr. Thompson, the city health officer, justly complains of a lack of co-operation among parents in the work of proper isolation. Most new cases are so mild that the children are allowed to run about the street and some have been sent home from school with symptoms plainly developing. This is sure to spread the disease, and some cases might prove more serious than in the past.
    The parent or guardian who carelessly allows a child to spread the disease is directly responsible to the public for the result. If all would exercise proper care the epidemic would soon be stamped out.
marriage Ebbett, Jennie

Boyer, Hartley

Local and Personal: Miss Jennie Ebbett, sister of A. M. Ebbett, was married on Christmas day in Vancouver, B. C., to Hartley Boyer. They will be at home after January 17, at Vancouver
marriage Faulconer, Bert GRAND RECEPTION FOR NEWLY WEDDED COUPLE
    Wednesday evening the I.O.O.F. hall was the scene of a grand reception given to Mr. and Mrs. Bert Faulconer, who were married at Seattle on Dec. 26. The reception was planned by close friends of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Smith
    The hall was beautifully decorated with festooning of white, silver and green set off with chrysanthemums and carnations.
    A buffet luncheon was served, those who did the honors being Mrs. G. Hazeltine, Mrs. Welch, Frank Sprague, O. Erickson, Grace and Belle Afflick, Josie Foster and Hazel Guinn.
    Mr. Faulconer favored the guests with a number of trombone solos, and dancing was enjoyed by all who wished to indulge. The bridal couple were the recipients of many fine presents in cut glass, silver, etc.
    The guests departed at a late hour wishing the newlyweds many years of unalloyed happiness.
marriage Messenger, Roy Local and Personal: Mr. and Mrs. Roy Messenger, whose marriage occurred in October, wish to announce that they will be "at home," to their friends at Sunnyside after Jan. 1, Wednesday afternoons only from 3:30 to 10:30 p.m.
of interest Soper, Fred Deer Hunting in Montana
    A friend in Montana has kindly sent the following item from the Lavina, Montana, Independent, with the added information that Fred Soper was a former Marysville resident: "Harold Lehfeldt of this city, and Fred Soper of Sunnyside, returned from the Belt mountains last week with four of the finest buck specimens of the deer family. The boys were gone about two weeks, but we knew they would not return without the necessary proof of their ability as big game hunters. Their trophies were admired by many sportsmen who were unable to connect with the solid horned ruminants of the genus Cervus this year."

Volume XXV Number 52 Friday, January 12, 1917
Official Paper of Marysville

HEADLINES

County Commissioners Issue Annual Report
Great Reduction in Fines
Home Wedding
How the Liquor Bills Faired at the Polls
I.O.O.F. and Rebekahs Install and Jollify
Kellogg Marsh Drainage District in the Balance
M.W.A. and R. N. A. Hold Joint Installation
Necessary to Register Again
New County Officers Took Charge Monday
Organize Athletic Club for Men of All Ages
Recruiting Officers for U. S. Navy in the City
Registration Notice

EXTRACTED EVENTS

Type Names
Event
liquor   Great Reduction in Fines
    Under the head of reports of officers at the last regular meeting it was interesting to note the difference in the number and amounts of fines made in the police judge's report as compared with 1915; when saloons were open. The revenue from police fines in 1915 were $385.70 whereas the report for 1916 shows receipts of only $117.45. The cost of running the police court for 1916 was only $17.00 compared with a $60 salary and other incidental expense connected with the department in 1915.
liquor   How the Liquor Bills Fared at the Polls
    Complete official figures now at hand of the vote in the November election the initiative and referendum bills, tell impressively of the overwhelming public judgment against any method of restoring the liquor traffic in Washington.
    Prohibition carried in this state two years ago by a rather close margin. Out of a total of 361,315 votes cast on the issue in 1914 prohibition won by only 18,691 majority.
    The prohibition law went into effect January 1, 1916, and the vote cast on the two initiative liquor measures in the recent November election was based on 10 months of experience and close observation of its effect.
    One question before the people was: "Shall we permit the breweries to resume manufacture and traffic under certain restrictions that will not restore the open saloons?" Against that measure 245,399 votes were cast; for it 98,843 - an adverse majority of 145,556 votes.
Another question before the voters was: "Shall we legalize the sale of liquor in hotels and restaurants under certain restrictions that will not restore the open saloon?" Against that measure 263,390 votes were cast: for it only 46,354: an adverse majority of 215,036 votes.
    These rejected measures proposed only a partial restoration of the liquor traffic in Washington. There were put forward in the expectation that they would be deemed less objectionable that a proposal to repeal the present prohibition law and return to the open saloon. In the light of the facts it can not be doubted that if the people had been voting on a straight issue between the present law and the old order their verdict against the saloon would have been still more emphatic and crushing--Spokane Spokeman Review.
marriage Markwell, Edward Home Wedding
    A quiet house wedding was solomnized on Monday afternoon last, at the home of Mrs. F. Laff, Kellogg Marsh, when her daughter Mae was united in Marriage to Mr. Edward Markwell of DesMoines Wash., in the presence of a company of the immediate relatives and friends of the family. The ceremony was performed by Rev. R. A. Cunningham, the young people being attended by Mr. and Mrs. O. E. Miller of Tacoma. Mr. and Mrs. Markwell left the same evening on a bridal trip to some of the coast cities, after which they will be at home to their friends in the new home at Hazel, Wash.
move Hayes, F. Bird Kellogg Marsh: F. Bird Hayes left Sunday for Goldendale where he has accepted a position as teacher in a school where five children are enrolled.
move Kinney, E. F. Local and Personal: Hon. E. F. Kinney and Mrs. Kinney, of Eyebrow, Saskatchawan, Canada, were in town for a few days on Monday calling on old friends and acquaintances. the Kenneys are oldtime residents of this part of the country at one time owning what is known as the John Hilton homestead, a few miles north of town on the Arlington road. They are on their way to California for the winter, and will return to Canada in the spring via the southern route to Iowa and the middle west, where they will visit, going home via Winnipeg.
of interest   Stimson's Crossing: Road conditions in this vicinity are the worst they have been in seven years. The slough of mud at the north end of the paved road was charted and posted on Tuesday. Anyone in need of a pilot can obtain one at the W. R. Swanson residence. Several automobiles have lost their way on this piece of road. One of the novel sights of this road, Friday was six autos stuck within a quarter of a mile.

Volume XXVI Number 1 Friday, January 19, 1917
Official Paper of Marysville

HEADLINES

EXTRACTED EVENTS

Type Names
Event
birth Swanson, son Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Swenson, formerly of this place, but now of Chehalis, announce the birth of a son on Dec. 31
crime liquor   WHISKEY TURNS TO WATER ODD TRANSFORMATION
A dispatch from Everett to the Seattle Times Sunday states that ten barrels of whiskey in charge of the sheriff's office have mysteriously turned into water.
    The whiskey was part of a carload seized by Sheriff Don McRae last October in a raid at Meadowdale. It was placed in a storage warehouse under lock and key. After a lawsuit had settled the question of whether or not the county had the right to destroy it, the new sheriff, James McCulloch, decided to check it up and see if it was all there. He did so, and found fifteen cases gone. That was on Wednesday
    Friday he continued his investigations and discovered that the ten barrels of whiskey had turned into water --when, where, how, neither he, the warehouse proprietor, or anyone else seems to know. It was whiskey when it went into the warehouse, it was water now and the warehouse has never been broken into.
    Some four weeks ago Sheriff Hodge of King county created a bit of excitement in the office of Snohomish county sheriff when he telephoned up that an attempt was to be made that night to break into the warehouse and steal the liquor. Nothing happened, however, and two or three other reports proved also false.
    Out of 200 cases and ten large barrels of whiskey seized last October there remains now but 185 cases and no whiskey.
crime liquor   PLEADS GUILTY AND IS FINED FOR SELLING BOOZE
    Town Marshal Powers and a deputy sheriff from Everett entered the Chas. Maes pool room on Front street Wednesday and seized liquor and entered complaint against Maes for selling liquor unlawfully. The hearing was called at 2 pm. before Police Magistrate Karl R. Gilmer,. Defendant plead guilty and was fined $50 and costs. He was immediately taken to Everett before Justice of the Peace Wm. R. Sheller, where he was assessed $150.00 and costs as the state's part of the legal penalty. He has still to be tried by the U. S. Court.
death Allan, Delton Local and Personal: Those who came from outside to attend the funeral of Delton Allan were: John Allan of Kittitas, Wash., an uncle of the deceased; Gurvais Allan, a brother, and wife, of Everett; Mr. and Mrs. A. Anderson of Everett; Inez L. Stroud and Mrs. Foster of Seattle, friends of the family.
death Allan, Delton Obituary: Died -- At Seattle, Washington, on Saturday, January 13, 1917, Delton Allan, age eighteen years.
    Delton Allen (sic) third son of Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Allan, was born in Marysville July 25, 1898. He attended the public school and grew up to young manhood here. About a year ago his health failed and altho every medical aid was tried he steadily grew worse. During the last two months his condition improved to the extent that he suffered no pain, regained some of his former strength and was able to resume his studies in a Seattle school. His death came as a great shock not only to his family but also to a large circle of his friends and friends of the family.
    The funeral was held from the family home on Tuesday afternoon and was largely attended, the pall bearers being the school mates of but a short time ago. The services were conducted by Mrs. Anna M. Cowan, First Reader of the First Church of Christ, Scientist, of Everett. Interment was made in the Odd Fellows' cemetery.
move Preutz Kruse: Mr. Pruetz has sold his place to J. Weaver of Alberta. Mr Pruetz and family have gone to Eatonville, Wash., where he is employed in a mill
of interest   A Building with a History
    Fish merchant A. Lockert has purchased the little building on Front street next west from the Marysville Meat Market belong to Steve Saunders. The building is to be moved to State street and placed on the alley corner of the Collins property. This will not be the first trip for this building as the little frame structure has had some traveling experience. The building was erected twenty-seven years ago on the south side and at the extreme west end of Front street at that time the center of town. Here it was occupied as a restaurant by a famous character of those days generally known as "Jack the Ripper."
    A few years later the building was moved to the corner of Fifth and Cedar streets on the property now owned by Mr. Roberts. On account of the location of the G. N. Depot this corner was supposed to be a coming business center. It did not so develop and about twenty years ago the building was moved to its present location which until recently was considered the hub of the town. Whether or not the latest ""guess" as to the center of the business section of Marysville is correct will have to be left to a future historian. There may be still another journey to go.

Volume XXVI Number 2 Friday, January 26, 1917
Official Paper of Marysville

HEADLINES

Attempted Robbery of Bank Frustrated
Car Shortage Again Acute in Marysville
Contract Let for Twelve Miles more of Highway
Girls Win, Boys Lose in Basket Ball at Sultan
Grade School Team Wins Against Silvana Five
Health Notice
High Cost of Living Hits Picture Shows
Making Good Use of the High School Gymnasium
Married in Seattle
Marysville-Everett Cut-Off Being Pushed
Population of County Makes Good Increase
Recruiting Officer of U. S. Army in Marysville

EXTRACTED EVENTS

Type Names
Event
crime robbery  ATTEMPTED ROBBERY OF BANK FRUSTRATED
    On Tuesday, at 3:10 o'clock., two young men, whose plans had become known to the police, were arrested on the point of entering the Scandinavian American Bank at Ballard. They were Floyd Morgan, a shingle weaver, aged 27, formerly of Marysville and Frank Wilson, a longshoreman, 22 years old.
    The two young men had planned the holdup of a Milwaukee Olympian train the night before, but the train was so late that it would be daylight before the time for the pulling off of the deal near Georgetown, so the plan was abandoned. They had been shadowed by officers for several days but were unaware of this fact and proceeded to carry out their plans for the hold up of the Ballard bank. Arrived at the bank they stood around half an hour waiting for a patrolman near by to move one. Finally they seemed about to enter when they were confronted by detectives and covered before they could pull a gun. They were found heavily armed.
    They have since confessed their plans to the authorities.
    Morgan in his confession complained that he did not want to carry the job through on account of the policeman standing a half half (sic) block distant. "Wilson is the leader," Morgan told the chief deputy. "He framed the whole thing and I agreed to it. That 'bull' down the street did not look good to me. I'll admit I did not want to go into that bank very bad in the sight of that policeman, and I stalled around thinking maybe he would go away."
    Morgan also told of his trip to Cedar Falls and corroborated in nearly every detail the advance information furnished by the detective agency of the plans to board the train, to work from the day coaches toward the end and to signal the train to stop outside of Georgetown, where it was planned to cross over the bluff that forms the west side of Beacon hill and come into the city on a street car.
    Morgan has been in Seattle off and on for a number of years. His home is said to be in Marysville, Wash., where he has an uncle. His mother, Mrs. Ella Staley, and a stepfather, live in Bourbon county, Kansas.
disease measles   HEALTH NOTICE
    On account of the increase in the present epidemic of measles it has been found advisable to notify the public that the following regulations will be rigidly enforced: "All cases of measles must be reported to the health officer, and none of the children of the family in which the disease exists shall attend any public or private school. Sunday school, theatre, or other assemblage of children until two weeks have elapsed since the beginning of the last case.
    "A placard bearing the word "measles" in letters not less than two inches high shall be affixed by the health officer in a conspicuous manner to the house where the disease exists and shall remain until its removal is authorized. Persons living in placarded houses may go about their usual occupations provided they do not bring them in contact with assemblages of children, but they must refrain from visiting places of amusement, worship or education.
    "All children who have not had the measles but who are known to have been recently exposed shall be excluded from school, Sunday school and other assemblages until two weeks have elapsed since the date exposure. And before such children may resume attendance at school a certificate must be obtained from the local health officer stating that they are no longer able to communicate the disease.
    We desire to remind the public that a refusal to obey these instructions constitutes a misdemeanor for which a penalty is provided. We hope that every householder will do his utmost to cooperate with the health officer: who does not wish to inflict any hardship and inconvenience upon the public other than is absolutely necessary.
    J. D. Thompson.
disease whooping cough  Kellogg Marsh: Whooping cough is the very latest in vogue on the Marsh.
marriage Cox, Edith Cox
- Matthews, Llewellyn
Married in Seattle
    Seattle, Wash., Jan. 23, 1917--Editor Globe: yesterday, Monday Jan. 22, Miss Edith Cox, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Cox of Marysville, was married to Llewellyn Matthews of Everett, son of Mr. and Mrs. T. Mathews (sic) in the presence of relatives, at the home of the officiating minister, 942 20th Ave. North Seattle. They were attended by Miss Marion Matthews, sister of the groom, and by Mr. Howard Johnston of Marysville. The wedding is the climax of an agreement made between the bride when a girl, and Rev. Richard Bushell, that when the time should come for her to change her name, Mr. Bushell was to be the man to do the job. And, now, the minister joins with her many friends in wishing health and happiness to Edith Matthews and her husband.

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